Undergraduate Profile Maheen Zakaria (ES ’17): Pakistani Philanthropic Prodigy

Undergraduate Profile Maheen Zakaria (ES ’17): Pakistani Philanthropic Prodigy

Born and raised in Pakistan, Maheen Zakaria ES ’17 has loved science for as long as she can remember. In Pakistan, students decide what “track” they want to pursue in life in middle school, and without hesitation, she chose science.

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Undergraduate Profile Katie Melbourne (SY ’19): From Yale to NASA

Undergraduate Profile Katie Melbourne (SY ’19): From Yale to NASA

Early in the morning, she trains for marathons to raise funds for Camp Kesem, a summer camp that supports children whose parents have cancer. Then she goes to work at the NASA headquarters in Washington, D.C., drafting international space agreements

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High School Profile: Sasha Thomas

High School Profile: Sasha Thomas

Sasha Thomas is a high school student challenging herself through research and biology competitions.

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Unveiling Venus’ Mysteries with Gravity Waves

Unveiling Venus’ Mysteries with Gravity Waves

The discovery of gravity waves on Venus sheds light on the mysteries of our closest neighbor in the solar system, with surprising implications for both Earth science and astronomy in general.

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Undergraduate Profile Dan McQuaid (ES ‘19): A Passion for Cancer Research

Undergraduate Profile Dan McQuaid (ES ‘19): A Passion for Cancer Research

Growing up in the suburbs of NYC in Ossining, New York, current Yale junior Dan McQuaid always had a personal relationship with cancer, the focus of his interests and research. A few members of his close family were diagnosed with

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Q&A: Why Do Killer Whales Go Through Menopause?

Q&A: Why Do Killer Whales Go Through Menopause?

Why do some species, including humans and killer whales, stop reproducing long before the end of their lives? A new study from Exeter University suggests that older females may gain adaptive advantages by helping to raise their daughters’ calves instead of raising their own.

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Q&A: What’s killing our honeybees?

Q&A: What’s killing our honeybees?

Researchers from Penn State have found that a class of chemicals formerly thought to be inert may actually be accelerating honeybee mortality.

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The Powerpuff Sponges: Sea sponges solve problems in structural engineering

The Powerpuff Sponges: Sea sponges solve problems in structural engineering

Deceptively flimsy, sea sponges may just be the key to stronger and more effective material design. Michael Monn and Haneesh Kesari investigated the structure properties of the rod-like spicules that give the sponges their shape and found that their tapered shape makes them 33% less likely to buckle under pressure.

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Unraveling the Chemistry of the Tightest Knot Yet

Unraveling the Chemistry of the Tightest Knot Yet

Knots have proven useful since the dawn of mankind. Drawing on this as inspiration, Professor David A. Leigh, along with his team at the University of Manchester’s School of Chemistry, synthesized the most complex chemical knot yet, and believe that it holds many promising applications.

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Modern Animals with Ancient Genes: Testing the causes of evolution

Modern Animals with Ancient Genes: Testing the causes of evolution

It was once thought fruit flies can process more alcohol than their sister species because of a difference in their genome. Now, a collaboration between evolutionary and molecular biologists is challenging this hypothesis by putting ancient genes in modern fruit flies

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