Studying the Few to Serve the Many: Studying the rare Gaucher disease to discover molecular mechanisms behind the common Parkinson’s Disease

Studying the Few to Serve the Many: Studying the rare Gaucher disease to discover molecular mechanisms behind the common Parkinson’s Disease

Yale scientists found two potential enzymes to target via cell therapy to treat the common variety of Parkinson’s disease associated with Gaucher disease. These two enzymes regulate the pathology of the specific lipids that accumulate due to Gaucher disease.

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Tracking Transition: From dinosaurs to birds, brain-skull evolution

Tracking Transition: From dinosaurs to birds, brain-skull evolution

New discovery in skull and brain development has implications for greater understanding of evolution of reptiles and birds.

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Demystifying the Genes Behind Breast Cancer

Demystifying the Genes Behind Breast Cancer

It’s taken over two decades to fit together pieces of information about the BRCA genes behind breast and ovarian cancer. Researchers in the Sung Lab at Yale University, led by Patrick Sung and Weixing Zhao, have tackled the problem by developing a way to study proteins, which led to discovering the function of BRCA1 and its interaction with other genes in the role of tumor expression.

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Guide to the Galaxy: A SAGA: Neighboring galaxies provide clues to the nature of the universe

Guide to the Galaxy: A SAGA: Neighboring galaxies provide clues to the nature of the universe

The Milky Way Galaxy has long been studied as a model for other galaxies in the universe. However, Yale professor Marla Geha is part of a collaboration exploring just how different the Milky Way might actually be.

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Macrophage Messengers: Specialized immune cells as targets for metabolism in aging

Macrophage Messengers: Specialized immune cells as targets for metabolism in aging

The communication between the nervous, immune, and metabolic systems changes as people age. A team led by Christina Camell and Vishwa Deep Dixit of the Yale School of Medicine discovered a subset of macrophages at this intersection that could open the door for new strategies to keep people healthier longer.

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Life 3.0 Review: Being Human in the Age of Artificial Intelligence

Life 3.0 Review: Being Human in the Age of Artificial Intelligence

A review of Max Tegmark’s new book on maintaining our humanity and planning for a future with artificial intelligence/advanced machine learning.

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Making the most of twists and turns: Harvesting mechanical energy with carbon nanotube yarns

Making the most of twists and turns: Harvesting mechanical energy with carbon nanotube yarns

American and South Korean scientists have developed carbon nanotube yarns that convert twisting and stretching motions into electrical signals. The applications range from wearable sensors to harnessing the energy of ocean waves.

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Undergraduate Profile: Alexander Epstein (SY ’18): Peering into the mind of a future leader in science

Undergraduate Profile: Alexander Epstein (SY ’18): Peering into the mind of a future leader in science

Yale senior Alex Epstein (SY ’18) discusses how he developed his interest in biology and research, from his childhood experiences at the Museum of Natural History to his research at Yale.

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Brilliant Bacteria: Programming Bacteria to Make Materials

Brilliant Bacteria: Programming Bacteria to Make Materials

Researchers at Duke have used synthetic biology techniques to engineer bacteria to produce a protein capable of constructing an electronic pressure sensor when supplemented with gold nanoparticles. With a variety of future applications, this technology will diversify how we use microorganisms in biophysical systems.

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Neurons that Drive and Quench Thirst: Identifying the neural mechanisms that regulate water consumption

Neurons that Drive and Quench Thirst: Identifying the neural mechanisms that regulate water consumption

Until now, thirst was known as a primordial drive that was poorly-understood on the neural level. Researchers at Stanford have identified a mechanism through which a small group of neurons motivate thirst-related behavior.

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