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Tag "Applied Physics"

In the Seas of Titan

In the Seas of Titan

An Extraterrestrial Submarine On a moon of Saturn called Titan, a dragonfly hovers over the equator, while a turtle ripples the surface of Kraken Mare, a sea of liquid methane. Surviving in temperatures below -300 °F, these aren’t hardy new

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Making the most of twists and turns: Harvesting mechanical energy with carbon nanotube yarns

Making the most of twists and turns: Harvesting mechanical energy with carbon nanotube yarns

American and South Korean scientists have developed carbon nanotube yarns that convert twisting and stretching motions into electrical signals. The applications range from wearable sensors to harnessing the energy of ocean waves.

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Real-Time Imaging of Dynamic Surfaces: A new microscope images surfaces 5000 times faster

Real-Time Imaging of Dynamic Surfaces: A new microscope images surfaces 5000 times faster

Researchers at the École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Switzerland, have constructed a new microscope that can be used to observe chemical reactions on surfaces at the molecular level, 5000 times faster than current microscopes.

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The Sound of Qubits: How Acoustics and Qubits Will Contribute to the Next Computing Revolution

The Sound of Qubits: How Acoustics and Qubits Will Contribute to the Next Computing Revolution

Quantum computing is harnessing the power of quantum mechanics to achieve computational feats once thought impossible. In the Schoelkopf Lab at the Yale Quantum Institute, the effort to experimentally design a quantum computer is moving quickly, and a recent finding shows promise in coupling qubits to sound waves.

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What’s Hot, Dense, and Spins Like Crazy?

What’s Hot, Dense, and Spins Like Crazy?

Just moments after the big bang, all matter existed in a state called the quark-gluon plasma. Yale professor Helen Caines and her group work with the STAR collaboration, together aiming to discover the properties of our universe this early in its history.

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Good PROSPECTs for Neutrino Physics: Yale Leads New Experiment For Weird Neutrino Behavior

Good PROSPECTs for Neutrino Physics: Yale Leads New Experiment For Weird Neutrino Behavior

In the time it takes you to read this sentence, more than 100 billion neutrinos from the sun will pass through your fingertip. You’re not likely to notice—the neutrino is a tiny, subatomic particle with virtually no mass. It interacts

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When Noise Becomes a Signal:  A Study of Random Motion

When Noise Becomes a Signal: A Study of Random Motion

The world is filled with chaos: the coffee you drink is a mixture of scattered particles swirling in random motion, ships are thrown to-and-fro by sudden bad weather, and wind blows your bike off course. A recent study demonstrates how this chaos can be reduced into a simple graph that can illustrate when, and how, chaos will strike.

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Needle in a HAYSTAC

Needle in a HAYSTAC

The HAYSTAC dark matter detection device probes the universe for radio waves that would confirm the existence of axions, a particle that could account for 80% of the mass in our universe.

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Study of the Center of the Earth

Study of the Center of the Earth

Scientists may finally be able to model magnetic fields more efficiently in the lab, thanks to the development of eGaIn, a magnetic liquid metal with unprecedentedly high magnetic and conductive properties.

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Chilling Precision: Cooling and trapping molecules with lasers

Chilling Precision: Cooling and trapping molecules with lasers

Researchers at Yale have developed a technique to cool down and levitate molecules in space, enabling new experiments that could revolutionize our understanding of fundamental physics.

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