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Tag "Astronomy"

What is a Black Hole?

What is a Black Hole?

The term “black hole” was coined in the 1960s by physicist Robert Dicke, aptly deriving from the Black Hole of Calcutta, an inescapable prison. But various fields of science assign different properties to these stellar objects—an issue professor Erik Curiel

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Scanning the Galaxy: The discovery of a hot Saturn

Scanning the Galaxy: The discovery of a hot Saturn

Have you ever wondered what may exist outside our solar system? In order to better understand our galaxy, NASA utilizes space telescopes to survey the sky, including the Transmitting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) launched last year. Like the Kepler mission,

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Some Dark Matters: Newly discovered galaxies lack dark matter

Some Dark Matters: Newly discovered galaxies lack dark matter

For astronomy researchers, the invisible nature of dark mat­ter is one of the most perplexing features of our universe. Dark matter is a theoretical form of matter that does not interact with light, and therefore cannot be directly observed by

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Are You There, Exoplanets? It’s Me, Earth

Are You There, Exoplanets? It’s Me, Earth

Space: the final frontier. Researchers at Yale work to boldly go where no researcher has gone before. With a newly designed EXtreme PREcision Spectrograph (EXPRES) that will clarify pre-existing data, Professor Debra Fischer and graduate student Lily Zhao are leading

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Diamond-Studded Rock Contrasts Prevailing View of Early Solar System

Diamond-Studded Rock Contrasts Prevailing View of Early Solar System

A meteorite found in Egypt in 1996, deemed “Hypatia,” was recently further analyzed by researchers at the University of Johannesberg. In their published results, they found that due to a number of unusual compositional features—including high carbon content and unique

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Big Bang, Give Me a Twirl

Big Bang, Give Me a Twirl

Radio telescopes reveal surprisingly neat rotation in extremely young galaxies “We are made of star stuff.” These timeless words from astrophysicist and space evangelist Carl Sagan are more than poetic rhetoric. The carbon, nitrogen, oxygen and silicon—so central to life

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Guide to the Galaxy: A SAGA: Neighboring galaxies provide clues to the nature of the universe

Guide to the Galaxy: A SAGA: Neighboring galaxies provide clues to the nature of the universe

The Milky Way Galaxy has long been studied as a model for other galaxies in the universe. However, Yale professor Marla Geha is part of a collaboration exploring just how different the Milky Way might actually be.

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What’s Hot, Dense, and Spins Like Crazy?

What’s Hot, Dense, and Spins Like Crazy?

Just moments after the big bang, all matter existed in a state called the quark-gluon plasma. Yale professor Helen Caines and her group work with the STAR collaboration, together aiming to discover the properties of our universe this early in its history.

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Starry Fuel Tanks: What fuels the starburst phases of galaxies?

Starry Fuel Tanks: What fuels the starburst phases of galaxies?

A long time ago, in galaxies far, far away, stars were churned out at unprecedented rates: over 100 solar masses were produced annually. These luminous, dusty starburst galaxies were 1000 times more common in the very early universe than they

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Hubble’s Successor: Continuing the Exploration of the Cosmos

Hubble’s Successor: Continuing the Exploration of the Cosmos

Since the dawn of humankind, our sights have always been drawn towards the stars, and as technological innovation continues to bolster our curiosity, our knowledge of the cosmos reaches new heights. NASA is looking to supply a new toolset for

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