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Tag "Biochemistry"

A Fatty, Hairy Secret: How fat, hair, and sweat help heal wounds

A Fatty, Hairy Secret: How fat, hair, and sweat help heal wounds

Studying the center of certain types of wounds shows how skin with fat, hair, and sweat glands actually are the key to healing wounds. This could offer new insight into the way we treat serious wounds!

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Silly Bacteria: Tricks are for Kids

Silly Bacteria: Tricks are for Kids

The influence of pathogens, either directly or indirectly, to manipulate vector microbiota for their own benefit, has not been very well described. This study has demonstrated that a pathogen can effectively “trick” vector microbiota and enhance infection. This allows better colonization of the vector.

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Modern Animals with Ancient Genes: Testing the causes of evolution

Modern Animals with Ancient Genes: Testing the causes of evolution

It was once thought fruit flies can process more alcohol than their sister species because of a difference in their genome. Now, a collaboration between evolutionary and molecular biologists is challenging this hypothesis by putting ancient genes in modern fruit flies

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The Fa(c)t of the Matter: How Fat Cells Regenerate — In a Good Way

The Fa(c)t of the Matter: How Fat Cells Regenerate — In a Good Way

Up until recently, very little has been understood about fat cell growth and maintenance. A new Yale study shines some light on the molecular mechanisms behind these processes, paving the way for future research.

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Bull’s Eye: Targeted Immunotherapy of Myasthenia Gravis

Bull’s Eye: Targeted Immunotherapy of Myasthenia Gravis

Myasthenia gravis is a motor disease, starting with muscular pain and potentially escalating to failure of vital muscles such as the diaphragm. Like other autoimmune diseases, it was historically treated with steroids, which suppress the immune system overall. Professor Richard Nowak at the Yale School of Medicine has found a much more targeted attack strategy.

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Book Review: I Contain Multitudes

Book Review: I Contain Multitudes

Ed Yong dives headfirst into the complex symbioses microbes have with humans and beyond, how these interactions can help and harm us, and the wonder and beauty of the relationships themselves.

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Piecing Together the Protein Repacking Puzzle

Piecing Together the Protein Repacking Puzzle

Proteins play an important role in all life processes. From catalyzing reactions to protecting our body to supporting cell structure, proteins have a wide variety of functions based on each specific protein’s structure. Naturally-occurring proteins are perfectly evolved for their

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Breathe Easy

Breathe Easy

Wouldn’t it be nice if killing lung cancer cells was as easy as flipping a switch? As it turns out, effectively targeting these cells is more like a dimmer rather than a switch, but it can be done, according to

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Follow the Light: Bacteria in Motion

Follow the Light: Bacteria in Motion

The smooth green surface of a rock sits just below a pond’s surface. Its deceptively uniform green coating is teeming with life: algae, bacteria, and other microorganisms. They all depend on sunlight for energy and are constantly competing with each

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Alumni Profile: Dr. Brian Kobilka (MD ’81)

Alumni Profile: Dr. Brian Kobilka (MD ’81)

Dr. Brian Kobilka has certainly had a successful career in research: he runs a biochemistry lab at Stanford, has published widely in top journals such as Science and Nature, and won a Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 2012 for his

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