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Tag "Biology"

Fluid-Screen: A Promising Yale Nanotechnology Startup

Fluid-Screen: A Promising Yale Nanotechnology Startup

🕔21:09, 17.Aug 2016

A project that began in a Yale classroom has since grown into a thriving and ambitious startup that promises to revolutionize the nanotechnology industry and change how we test potentially contaminated water. Monika Weber, an Electrical Engineering Ph.D. candidate, founded

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Gender Bender: Genetically Modifying Mosquito Sex

Gender Bender: Genetically Modifying Mosquito Sex

🕔20:55, 17.Aug 2016

For many years, gene editing has been hailed as the future of medicine. As the genetic basis of disease becomes clearer, researchers continue to discover more ways to alter the genome and prevent or cure diseases. Recently, a new gene

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Follow the Light: Bacteria in Motion

Follow the Light: Bacteria in Motion

🕔19:31, 17.Aug 2016

The smooth green surface of a rock sits just below a pond’s surface. Its deceptively uniform green coating is teeming with life: algae, bacteria, and other microorganisms. They all depend on sunlight for energy and are constantly competing with each

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BPA-Free Isn’t Always Better: The dangers of BPS, a BPA substitute

BPA-Free Isn’t Always Better: The dangers of BPS, a BPA substitute

🕔18:52, 17.Aug 2016

In the early 1950s, manufacturers began to use the compound bisphenol A—more colloquially known as BPA—as a strengthening agent in commercial plastics. It wasn’t until forty years later that researchers began to suspect that synthetic chemicals like BPA could disrupt

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Blast from the Past: Antibiotics Past and Present

Blast from the Past: Antibiotics Past and Present

🕔18:37, 17.Aug 2016

With antibiotic resistance on the rise, researchers are frantically searching for ways to counter new bacterial “superbugs.” Instead of looking for new state-of-the-art solutions, researchers might have more success dusting off ancient medieval texts. Just last summer, scientists discovered that

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Alumni Profile: Dr. Brian Kobilka (MD ’81)

Alumni Profile: Dr. Brian Kobilka (MD ’81)

🕔18:26, 17.Aug 2016

Dr. Brian Kobilka has certainly had a successful career in research: he runs a biochemistry lab at Stanford, has published widely in top journals such as Science and Nature, and won a Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 2012 for his

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Sniffing Out Alzheimer’s: Olfaction as a Diagnostic and Research Tool

Sniffing Out Alzheimer’s: Olfaction as a Diagnostic and Research Tool

🕔00:26, 3.Apr 2016

The sense of smell has often provided us valuable insights into disease progression and treatments. Now, a recent study has shown that changes in the smell of one’s urine can predict the onset of Alzheimer’s disease.

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Battling Cancer with Our Body’s Own Trojan Horse: The Exosome

Battling Cancer with Our Body’s Own Trojan Horse: The Exosome

🕔23:59, 2.Apr 2016

You may have never heard of the anti-cancer drug paclitaxel, but it is indispensable to our modern healthcare system. It sits on the World Health Organization’s List of Essential Medicines, and its annual sales surpassed one billion dollars in 2000.

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Mythbusters: Human Microbiota

Mythbusters: Human Microbiota

🕔21:40, 2.Apr 2016

The human digestive tract is a thriving ecosystem, teeming with life and activity. On an intellectual level, many of us know this, even if it can be discomfiting to think about the trillions of living cells in our guts that

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Francis Collins: Guiding the Research Revolution

Francis Collins: Guiding the Research Revolution

🕔21:27, 23.Mar 2016

Alumnus Francis Collins (PhD ’74) initially held little interest for the field of biology. Yet he went on to successfully direct the Human Genome Project, the largest endeavor in genetic research. Collins now serves as Director of the NIH, the largest contributor to medical research in the world.

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