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Tag "Biology"

Studying the Few to Serve the Many: Studying the rare Gaucher disease to discover molecular mechanisms behind the common Parkinson’s Disease

Studying the Few to Serve the Many: Studying the rare Gaucher disease to discover molecular mechanisms behind the common Parkinson’s Disease

Yale scientists found two potential enzymes to target via cell therapy to treat the common variety of Parkinson’s disease associated with Gaucher disease. These two enzymes regulate the pathology of the specific lipids that accumulate due to Gaucher disease.

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Demystifying the Genes Behind Breast Cancer

Demystifying the Genes Behind Breast Cancer

It’s taken over two decades to fit together pieces of information about the BRCA genes behind breast and ovarian cancer. Researchers in the Sung Lab at Yale University, led by Patrick Sung and Weixing Zhao, have tackled the problem by developing a way to study proteins, which led to discovering the function of BRCA1 and its interaction with other genes in the role of tumor expression.

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Macrophage Messengers: Specialized immune cells as targets for metabolism in aging

Macrophage Messengers: Specialized immune cells as targets for metabolism in aging

The communication between the nervous, immune, and metabolic systems changes as people age. A team led by Christina Camell and Vishwa Deep Dixit of the Yale School of Medicine discovered a subset of macrophages at this intersection that could open the door for new strategies to keep people healthier longer.

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Undergraduate Profile: Alexander Epstein (SY ’18): Peering into the mind of a future leader in science

Undergraduate Profile: Alexander Epstein (SY ’18): Peering into the mind of a future leader in science

Yale senior Alex Epstein (SY ’18) discusses how he developed his interest in biology and research, from his childhood experiences at the Museum of Natural History to his research at Yale.

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Brilliant Bacteria: Programming Bacteria to Make Materials

Brilliant Bacteria: Programming Bacteria to Make Materials

Researchers at Duke have used synthetic biology techniques to engineer bacteria to produce a protein capable of constructing an electronic pressure sensor when supplemented with gold nanoparticles. With a variety of future applications, this technology will diversify how we use microorganisms in biophysical systems.

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Q&A: Can Evaporation Drive Energy Production?

Q&A: Can Evaporation Drive Energy Production?

Scientists are looking into using the evaporation of lakes as a new energy resource.

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Optimal Leaps in Optimizing Fat Burn: Improving Our Diet and Health Routines With a Coin-Size Sensor

Optimal Leaps in Optimizing Fat Burn: Improving Our Diet and Health Routines With a Coin-Size Sensor

Think your diet and workout routine are burning fat? You might want to check again. Researchers at ETH Zurich and the University Hospital Zurich have developed an affordable, portable and reliable breath sensor to test rates of fat burning during and following exercise.

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Pesticides, Honey, and Dead Bees: Global honey contamination with neonicotinoids

Pesticides, Honey, and Dead Bees: Global honey contamination with neonicotinoids

A team of researchers from University and Botanical Garden of Neuchâtel constructed a global map of honey exposure to a class of pesticides termed “neonics,” showing that 75% of all samples were contaminated with the pesticides.

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How Genes Affect Your Flu Vaccines

How Genes Affect Your Flu Vaccines

A national study has confirmed a genetic link to our bodies’ responses to the flu vaccine. Yale Associate Professor of Medicine Ruth Montgomery explains the significance of this discovery to the future of vaccination.

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Lyme and Punishment: How Human Activity May Affect the Spread of Lyme disease

Lyme and Punishment: How Human Activity May Affect the Spread of Lyme disease

Contrary to the popular Plum Island conspiracy, Lyme disease may have origins some 60,000 years in the past.

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