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Everyday Q&A: What causes rigor mortis?

Everyday Q&A: What causes rigor mortis?

Katherine Zhou February 25, 2010 1

Rigor mortis, the stiffening of a body several hours after death, arises from a combination of two of the oldest definitions of death – cessation of the heartbeat and cessation of breathing

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Prosopagnosia – Whose Face is It?

Prosopagnosia – Whose Face is It?

Ben Deen February 25, 2010 0

Prosopagnosia is a selective and often severe deficit in the ability to recognize others’ faces. People suffering from the disorder are often unable to recognize their friends and family members by face alone

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The Rice Atlas

The Rice Atlas

Regina Luna February 25, 2010 0

Oryza sativa, more commonly known as rice, has served as a model organism for biological research regarding molecular genetics, and the Rice Atlas, a database of gene activity in 60 different rice cells types

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Immunological Studies by HHMI Early Career Scientist

Phong Lee February 25, 2010 0

Associate Professor of Immunobiology Susan Kaech, an expert on T cell differentiation, is now a Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) Early Career Scientist

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Studying Mood Disorders With MRI Brain Analyses

Studying Mood Disorders With MRI Brain Analyses

Kristen Johnson February 25, 2010 0

Dr. Hilary Blumberg has used MRI to investigated the effect of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (bDNF) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) on brain structure and development

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New Methods to Detect Pigment Preservation in Fossil Feathers

Adrian LeCesne February 25, 2010 0

Thanks to preserved evidence of melanin in a fossil feather from Brazil, paleontologists at the Peabody Museum have come one step closer to reconstructing a visual representation of early birds and dinosaurs

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Bacterial Kayaking

Bacterial Kayaking

Katherine Zhou February 25, 2010 0

Hür Köser, Associate Professor of Electrical Engi­neering, came across bacterial hydrodynamics when studying chemotaxis, or the way bacteria direct their motion in response to chemical signals.

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Moving Beyond a Classic Role of MicroRNAs

Moving Beyond a Classic Role of MicroRNAs

David Colognori February 25, 2010 0

The 2009 Scaringe Award from the RNA Society was awarded to Shobha Vasudevan, post­doctoral fellow in Joan Steitz’s laboratory, who has discovered a novel role for microRNAs in quiescent frog cells

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Examining Leaves to Regenerate Rain Forests

Examining Leaves to Regenerate Rain Forests

Carol Hsin February 25, 2010 0

The adaptations that trees undergo in different microenvironments are of interest to Mark Ashton, Morris K. Jesup Professor of Silviculture and Forest Ecology, who believes that knowledge of a tree’s leaf plasticity can lend

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“Elm City”: the Tragic Misnomer: The Loss of Elms on Hillhouse Avenue Provides Greater Lessons on the Dangers of Monoculture

“Elm City”: the Tragic Misnomer: The Loss of Elms on Hillhouse Avenue Provides Greater Lessons on the Dangers of Monoculture

Carol Hsin October 25, 2009 0

Pressured by market economics and encouraged by politicians, farmers have largely abandoned the traditional methods of crop rotation, but current methods of monoculture leave crops, and entire species, vulnerable to disease

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