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Tag "Biology"

Brilliant Bacteria: Programming Bacteria to Make Materials

Brilliant Bacteria: Programming Bacteria to Make Materials

Researchers at Duke have used synthetic biology techniques to engineer bacteria to produce a protein capable of constructing an electronic pressure sensor when supplemented with gold nanoparticles. With a variety of future applications, this technology will diversify how we use microorganisms in biophysical systems.

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Q&A: Can Evaporation Drive Energy Production?

Q&A: Can Evaporation Drive Energy Production?

Scientists are looking into using the evaporation of lakes as a new energy resource.

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Optimal Leaps in Optimizing Fat Burn: Improving Our Diet and Health Routines With a Coin-Size Sensor

Optimal Leaps in Optimizing Fat Burn: Improving Our Diet and Health Routines With a Coin-Size Sensor

Think your diet and workout routine are burning fat? You might want to check again. Researchers at ETH Zurich and the University Hospital Zurich have developed an affordable, portable and reliable breath sensor to test rates of fat burning during and following exercise.

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Pesticides, Honey, and Dead Bees: Global honey contamination with neonicotinoids

Pesticides, Honey, and Dead Bees: Global honey contamination with neonicotinoids

A team of researchers from University and Botanical Garden of Neuchâtel constructed a global map of honey exposure to a class of pesticides termed “neonics,” showing that 75% of all samples were contaminated with the pesticides.

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How Genes Affect Your Flu Vaccines

How Genes Affect Your Flu Vaccines

A national study has confirmed a genetic link to our bodies’ responses to the flu vaccine. Yale Associate Professor of Medicine Ruth Montgomery explains the significance of this discovery to the future of vaccination.

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Lyme and Punishment: How Human Activity May Affect the Spread of Lyme disease

Lyme and Punishment: How Human Activity May Affect the Spread of Lyme disease

Contrary to the popular Plum Island conspiracy, Lyme disease may have origins some 60,000 years in the past.

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Not So Tumor Suppressant: How a single gene can both promote and suppress tumor growth

Not So Tumor Suppressant: How a single gene can both promote and suppress tumor growth

Tet2, a gene believed to be a tumor suppressor since 2009, may also have tumor-promoting effects on other types of cancer, raising some interesting questions about what it means to be a tumor suppressor and how Tet2 could affect different cancer treatments.

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Giving Genes PiggyBac Rides

Giving Genes PiggyBac Rides

New technology that enables certain segments of DNA to “jump” around the genome via a cut and paste method can serve as a more cost-effective, time-efficient alternative to using STEM cells

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A Graft that Grows With You: How Grafts Become a Part of Your Heart

A Graft that Grows With You: How Grafts Become a Part of Your Heart

Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of disease and death in the U.S, yet patients with faulty arteries are forced to deal with synthetic arterial grafts that degrade slowly, prompting further invasive treatment that costs patients, families, and medical personnel time and money. Ramak Khosravi, MD/PhD candidate at Yale, has come up with a method that she hopes will produce a graft that can seamlessly integrate into human bodies.

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Cryo-Electron Microscopy Made Easier on the Pocketbook

Cryo-Electron Microscopy Made Easier on the Pocketbook

Yale researchers have unveiled a new cryo-electron microscope, able to probe within the structure of proteins.

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