Back to homepage

Tag "Biology"

The Immune System and its Frontier Defense Against Herpes

The Immune System and its Frontier Defense Against Herpes

🕔14:01, 18.Jan 2015

Herpes Simple Virus Type II is capable of eluding vaccines that utilize the body’s adaptive immune response. Yale Professor of Immunobiology Akiko Iwasaki and her research group have discovered a network of immune cells that provides sustained protection at the site of infection, suggesting a more effective approach to vaccine development.

Read Full Article
Mythbusters: The Cam Jansen Effect

Mythbusters: The Cam Jansen Effect

🕔13:52, 18.Jan 2015

Many people wish they had the memory of fictional detective Cam Jansen, who can remember scenes so vividly and so accurately, it is as if she is looking at a photograph. As amazing as this ability is in helping Cam Jansen solve mysteries, evidence suggests that it is not possible in real life.

Read Full Article
Unsolved Mysteries: The Enigmatic Mechanism of Age-old Antibiotics

Unsolved Mysteries: The Enigmatic Mechanism of Age-old Antibiotics

🕔13:39, 18.Jan 2015

Recent studies in the field of microbiology have overturned prior beliefs on the mechanism of action of antibiotics. These findings hold promise for the future development of antibiotic drugs for combatting the rise in superbugs worldwide. But first, the mystery surrounding antibiotics must be solved.

Read Full Article
Fighting Obesity: Uncovering a Pathway to Change

Fighting Obesity: Uncovering a Pathway to Change

🕔13:34, 18.Jan 2015

A better understanding of neural interaction with fat tissue can lead to more targeted treatments for obesity.

Read Full Article
One Sweet Gene: Exploiting Genes to Keep Us Lean

One Sweet Gene: Exploiting Genes to Keep Us Lean

🕔13:34, 18.Jan 2015

Recent research on the worm C. elegans reveals a connection between the gene SKN-1, proline, and fat accumulation. In the future, miracle drugs may target these genes to prevent weight gain, even in the condition of a high-sugar diet.

Read Full Article
Book Review: “Working Stiff” – Two Years, 262 Bodies, and the Making of a Medical Examiner

Book Review: “Working Stiff” – Two Years, 262 Bodies, and the Making of a Medical Examiner

🕔13:31, 18.Jan 2015

In Working Stiff, Dr. Judy Melinek presents her work as a medical examiner trainee in forensic pathology. The text is fascinating, engaging, and emotional – unfortunately, it is not entirely scientific.

Read Full Article
Q&A: Do concussions lead to depression?

Q&A: Do concussions lead to depression?

🕔13:26, 18.Jan 2015

Recent studies have shown that concussions are correlated with depression, but more work needs to be done to probe for causation.

Read Full Article
Protecting the Nonhuman from the Inhumane: Personhood and Chimpanzees

Protecting the Nonhuman from the Inhumane: Personhood and Chimpanzees

🕔13:23, 18.Jan 2015

Recently, the Nonhuman Rights Project fought for legal personhood for a 26 year-old chimpanzee named Tommy. The case relates to current research on primate genetics, cognition, and emotion.

Read Full Article
Shading, Texture, and Color: How the Brain Makes Sense of Shape and Substance

Shading, Texture, and Color: How the Brain Makes Sense of Shape and Substance

🕔13:12, 18.Jan 2015

The world is a beautiful mess of visual information. Yale Professor Steven Zucker and his research group recently announced findings that unite mathematics, neurobiology, and psychology to make sense of how the brain makes sense of it all.

Read Full Article
Connecting the Address Book to the Family Tree for the Earth’s Vertebrates

Connecting the Address Book to the Family Tree for the Earth’s Vertebrates

🕔13:11, 18.Jan 2015

Professor Walter Jetz recently received a boost in NSF funding for projects integrating the global distribution of species with their placement on the tree of life.

Read Full Article