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Tag "Biomedical Engineering"

Cracking The Code of mRNA Regulation

Cracking The Code of mRNA Regulation

Yale researchers have developed a technique to decode a heretofore-undeciphered language – that which governs the survival and destruction of our transcriptomes.

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Reading Your Annotated Code: Mapping cytosine methylation with Nanopore sequencing

Reading Your Annotated Code: Mapping cytosine methylation with Nanopore sequencing

DNA methylation plays an important role in gene expression and cancer, and a new paper in Nature Methods presents a novel method for determining methylation sites using Nanopore sequencing.

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A Fatty, Hairy Secret: How fat, hair, and sweat help heal wounds

A Fatty, Hairy Secret: How fat, hair, and sweat help heal wounds

Studying the center of certain types of wounds shows how skin with fat, hair, and sweat glands actually are the key to healing wounds. This could offer new insight into the way we treat serious wounds!

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Silly Bacteria: Tricks are for Kids

Silly Bacteria: Tricks are for Kids

The influence of pathogens, either directly or indirectly, to manipulate vector microbiota for their own benefit, has not been very well described. This study has demonstrated that a pathogen can effectively “trick” vector microbiota and enhance infection. This allows better colonization of the vector.

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Watching Your Health with Wearables: Detecting Illnesses with Smartwatches

Watching Your Health with Wearables: Detecting Illnesses with Smartwatches

The Snyder Lab at Stanford is working on an algorithm that uses medical data from wearable biosensors like smartwatches to detect when people get sick. Their research could completely change the way we diagnose and treat diseases.

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Insight into Eyesight: Reawakening Retinal Stem Cells

Insight into Eyesight: Reawakening Retinal Stem Cells

Dr. Bo Chen and his team of researchers at Yale University have figured out a way to activate the stem cell ability of MGs, a special group of glial cells in the retina. Their discovery could someday help restore eyesight to patients whose retinas have been damaged by disease.

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Superbugs See Stars: Polymer nanotechnology may finally overcome antibiotic resistance

Superbugs See Stars: Polymer nanotechnology may finally overcome antibiotic resistance

Antibiotic-resistant bacteria are an ever-increasing global health concern, but one team of scientists from Melbourne have brought us closer to a solution with tiny, star-shaped polymers that may prove more effective at killing bacteria than any antibiotic drug ever has.

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Q&A: Three’s a Crowd—How can a baby have three parents?

Q&A: Three’s a Crowd—How can a baby have three parents?

For parents whose children are at risk of inheriting a mitochondrial disorder, genetic material from a third person can help them conceive a healthy child. Mitochondria are maternally inherited organelles, so if a mother’s mitochondrial DNA is mutated, her children

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Sticking It to Cancer: Fighting Tumors with Nanoparticles

Sticking It to Cancer: Fighting Tumors with Nanoparticles

Nanoparticles offer an alternative treatment for administering drugs to cancer patients with ovarian and uterine carcinomas. Yale researchers have demonstrated the efficacy of drug delivery via a bioadhesive class of these nanoparticles.

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Pathogen or Protector? Salmonella Slams Cancer

Pathogen or Protector? Salmonella Slams Cancer

Synthetic biology, an emerging and fascinating field at the crossroads of natural and technical science, once served only as fodder for sci-fi films. And while it’s doubtful that scientists are working on the next Frankenstein, the field has since progressed

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