Back to homepage

Tag "Biomedical Engineering"

It’s What’s on the Outside that Counts

It’s What’s on the Outside that Counts

When we think about disease, we often wonder what has changed insideaffected cells. Yet, perhaps taking a look at the surrounding environment is just as important. In the case of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), a disease marked by thickening of the

Read Full Article
Making New Lungs: An important development in tissue-engineering brings hope for better treatment of respiratory and vascular diseases

Making New Lungs: An important development in tissue-engineering brings hope for better treatment of respiratory and vascular diseases

Lungs are one of the most important organs in our bodies, responsible for an essential daily function–breathing. Those with lung disease or damage are often left in a precarious state. Many with severe lung disease rely on respirators or transplants,

Read Full Article
Will it stick? Biodegradable nanoparticles developed by Yale scientists to revolutionize sunscreen

Will it stick? Biodegradable nanoparticles developed by Yale scientists to revolutionize sunscreen

Have you ever forgotten to apply sunscreen at the beach? The sting of red skin after a day in the sun is a not so subtle reminder of the damages of UV radiation. Traditional sunscreens may seem like the answer;

Read Full Article
Accelerating MRI: A novel sampling method to shorten MRI scan time

Accelerating MRI: A novel sampling method to shorten MRI scan time

Imagine yourself mowing a lawn. If it was a leisurely Sunday morning, you might go back and forth in neat rows to ensure that every blade of grass was evenly cut. But what if you were in a rush? You

Read Full Article
Brilliant Bacteria: Programming Bacteria to Make Materials

Brilliant Bacteria: Programming Bacteria to Make Materials

Researchers at Duke have used synthetic biology techniques to engineer bacteria to produce a protein capable of constructing an electronic pressure sensor when supplemented with gold nanoparticles. With a variety of future applications, this technology will diversify how we use microorganisms in biophysical systems.

Read Full Article
A Graft that Grows With You: How Grafts Become a Part of Your Heart

A Graft that Grows With You: How Grafts Become a Part of Your Heart

Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of disease and death in the U.S, yet patients with faulty arteries are forced to deal with synthetic arterial grafts that degrade slowly, prompting further invasive treatment that costs patients, families, and medical personnel time and money. Ramak Khosravi, MD/PhD candidate at Yale, has come up with a method that she hopes will produce a graft that can seamlessly integrate into human bodies.

Read Full Article
Cracking The Code of mRNA Regulation

Cracking The Code of mRNA Regulation

Yale researchers have developed a technique to decode a heretofore-undeciphered language – that which governs the survival and destruction of our transcriptomes.

Read Full Article
Reading Your Annotated Code: Mapping cytosine methylation with Nanopore sequencing

Reading Your Annotated Code: Mapping cytosine methylation with Nanopore sequencing

DNA methylation plays an important role in gene expression and cancer, and a new paper in Nature Methods presents a novel method for determining methylation sites using Nanopore sequencing.

Read Full Article
A Fatty, Hairy Secret: How fat, hair, and sweat help heal wounds

A Fatty, Hairy Secret: How fat, hair, and sweat help heal wounds

Studying the center of certain types of wounds shows how skin with fat, hair, and sweat glands actually are the key to healing wounds. This could offer new insight into the way we treat serious wounds!

Read Full Article
Silly Bacteria: Tricks are for Kids

Silly Bacteria: Tricks are for Kids

The influence of pathogens, either directly or indirectly, to manipulate vector microbiota for their own benefit, has not been very well described. This study has demonstrated that a pathogen can effectively “trick” vector microbiota and enhance infection. This allows better colonization of the vector.

Read Full Article