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Tag "Cell Biology"

Studying the Few to Serve the Many: Studying the rare Gaucher disease to discover molecular mechanisms behind the common Parkinson’s Disease

Studying the Few to Serve the Many: Studying the rare Gaucher disease to discover molecular mechanisms behind the common Parkinson’s Disease

Yale scientists found two potential enzymes to target via cell therapy to treat the common variety of Parkinson’s disease associated with Gaucher disease. These two enzymes regulate the pathology of the specific lipids that accumulate due to Gaucher disease.

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Demystifying the Genes Behind Breast Cancer

Demystifying the Genes Behind Breast Cancer

It’s taken over two decades to fit together pieces of information about the BRCA genes behind breast and ovarian cancer. Researchers in the Sung Lab at Yale University, led by Patrick Sung and Weixing Zhao, have tackled the problem by developing a way to study proteins, which led to discovering the function of BRCA1 and its interaction with other genes in the role of tumor expression.

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Destroying Viruses: A New Protein Could Unlock the Key to Curing Respiratory and Mosquito-Borne Viruses

Destroying Viruses: A New Protein Could Unlock the Key to Curing Respiratory and Mosquito-Borne Viruses

Despite advances in modern medicine, many respiratory and mosquito-borne viruses still have few treatment options. SPCA1, a calcium transporter required in the viral life cycle, may be a potential target to eliminate viruses such as RSV, Zika, and West Nile.

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Not So Tumor Suppressant: How a single gene can both promote and suppress tumor growth

Not So Tumor Suppressant: How a single gene can both promote and suppress tumor growth

Tet2, a gene believed to be a tumor suppressor since 2009, may also have tumor-promoting effects on other types of cancer, raising some interesting questions about what it means to be a tumor suppressor and how Tet2 could affect different cancer treatments.

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A Graft that Grows With You: How Grafts Become a Part of Your Heart

A Graft that Grows With You: How Grafts Become a Part of Your Heart

Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of disease and death in the U.S, yet patients with faulty arteries are forced to deal with synthetic arterial grafts that degrade slowly, prompting further invasive treatment that costs patients, families, and medical personnel time and money. Ramak Khosravi, MD/PhD candidate at Yale, has come up with a method that she hopes will produce a graft that can seamlessly integrate into human bodies.

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Cryo-Electron Microscopy Made Easier on the Pocketbook

Cryo-Electron Microscopy Made Easier on the Pocketbook

Yale researchers have unveiled a new cryo-electron microscope, able to probe within the structure of proteins.

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The Search: Mathematical model explains diversity in cancer cell movement

The Search: Mathematical model explains diversity in cancer cell movement

If cancer cells can’t find the highways of the body, they can’t spread and become more lethal. A mathematical model developed by Andre Levchenko and JinSeok Park of the Yale Systems Biology Institute provides a framework to explain cell migration behavior that can be implemented down the line to keep cells searching longer.

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Science in the Spotlight: The Telomerase Revolution

Science in the Spotlight: The Telomerase Revolution

What if aging could be stopped, or even reversed? Michael Fossel, University of Michigan professor of clinical science and the author of The Telomerase Revolution, writes about the potential for aging to be reversed using the enzyme telomerase.

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Molecular Speak: How Gut Bacteria Communicate with Human Cells

Molecular Speak: How Gut Bacteria Communicate with Human Cells

Researchers at the Rockefeller Institute identified groups of gut bacteria that produce molecules capable of interacting with human cells.

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The Twists And Turns Of Flowers

The Twists And Turns Of Flowers

A molecule in your jam plays a role in the twisting of flower petals. Yale Professor of Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology, Vivian Irish, studies how a genetic mutation causes epidermal cells and flower organs to twist.

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