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Tag "Cell Biology"

One Neuron Remembering a Memory

One Neuron Remembering a Memory

Most people prefer sitting in a room with AC than sitting in a hot field.  Research scientist Josh Hawk and his team study the neural mechanisms behind remembering and acting upon temperature preference memories like these, except they study this

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Legionnaires’ Disease Linked to Some CT Watersheds

Legionnaires’ Disease Linked to Some CT Watersheds

In the 21st century, some believe water contamination in the United States is an issue of the past. Advancements in plumbing, sanitation, and water treatment have drastically reduced the number of diseases spread through infected water. In Connecticut, however, one

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Triggering the Response

Triggering the Response

New Vaccine Delivery for a more Effective Immune Response You probably had a sore deltoid muscle after your flu vaccine this year. This is because this standard shot is delivered straight into muscle. But there’s another problem besides you getting

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Defeating Diabetes

Defeating Diabetes

Advances in Cell Encapsulation Technology A young boy is rushed into the Emergency Department after being discovered unconscious. He’s with his mother, who reports that earlier that evening, her son had been thirsty, nauseous, and urinating frequently. He’s now gasping

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Studying the Few to Serve the Many: Studying the rare Gaucher disease to discover molecular mechanisms behind the common Parkinson’s Disease

Studying the Few to Serve the Many: Studying the rare Gaucher disease to discover molecular mechanisms behind the common Parkinson’s Disease

Yale scientists found two potential enzymes to target via cell therapy to treat the common variety of Parkinson’s disease associated with Gaucher disease. These two enzymes regulate the pathology of the specific lipids that accumulate due to Gaucher disease.

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Demystifying the Genes Behind Breast Cancer

Demystifying the Genes Behind Breast Cancer

It’s taken over two decades to fit together pieces of information about the BRCA genes behind breast and ovarian cancer. Researchers in the Sung Lab at Yale University, led by Patrick Sung and Weixing Zhao, have tackled the problem by developing a way to study proteins, which led to discovering the function of BRCA1 and its interaction with other genes in the role of tumor expression.

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Destroying Viruses: A New Protein Could Unlock the Key to Curing Respiratory and Mosquito-Borne Viruses

Destroying Viruses: A New Protein Could Unlock the Key to Curing Respiratory and Mosquito-Borne Viruses

Despite advances in modern medicine, many respiratory and mosquito-borne viruses still have few treatment options. SPCA1, a calcium transporter required in the viral life cycle, may be a potential target to eliminate viruses such as RSV, Zika, and West Nile.

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Not So Tumor Suppressant: How a single gene can both promote and suppress tumor growth

Not So Tumor Suppressant: How a single gene can both promote and suppress tumor growth

Tet2, a gene believed to be a tumor suppressor since 2009, may also have tumor-promoting effects on other types of cancer, raising some interesting questions about what it means to be a tumor suppressor and how Tet2 could affect different cancer treatments.

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A Graft that Grows With You: How Grafts Become a Part of Your Heart

A Graft that Grows With You: How Grafts Become a Part of Your Heart

Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of disease and death in the U.S, yet patients with faulty arteries are forced to deal with synthetic arterial grafts that degrade slowly, prompting further invasive treatment that costs patients, families, and medical personnel time and money. Ramak Khosravi, MD/PhD candidate at Yale, has come up with a method that she hopes will produce a graft that can seamlessly integrate into human bodies.

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Cryo-Electron Microscopy Made Easier on the Pocketbook

Cryo-Electron Microscopy Made Easier on the Pocketbook

Yale researchers have unveiled a new cryo-electron microscope, able to probe within the structure of proteins.

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