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Tag "Cell Biology"

Breathe Easy

Breathe Easy

Wouldn’t it be nice if killing lung cancer cells was as easy as flipping a switch? As it turns out, effectively targeting these cells is more like a dimmer rather than a switch, but it can be done, according to

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Eczema Patients Have a Unique Microbiome

Eczema Patients Have a Unique Microbiome

Patients with atopic dermatitis, also known as eczema, have a unique skin microbiome. Knowing more about the relationship between the microbiome and skin conditions like eczema could result in novel, targeted therapies.

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Yale Fights Back Against Aggressive Cancers

Yale Fights Back Against Aggressive Cancers

The Yale Cancer Biology Institute on West Campus is now the nexus of a new initiative geared towards understanding the dynamic changes in cell behavior that characterize cancer. The Institute, together with its collaborators, was the recipient of a 9.5 million dollar grant from the NIH; the funding may pave the way for more advanced therapies that target metastatic cells.

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The More, The Merrier? Characterizing the behavior of cell-to-cell communication

The More, The Merrier? Characterizing the behavior of cell-to-cell communication

A team of researchers spanning multiple universities, led by Yale Professor Andre Levchenko, has experimentally quantified some of the methods by which cells communicate.

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Highly Aromatic with a Smooth, Microbial Finish: Yeast S. cerevisiae dictates the nuances of wine

Highly Aromatic with a Smooth, Microbial Finish: Yeast S. cerevisiae dictates the nuances of wine

There’s a new reason to say ‘cheers’ to the microbe. For the first time, scientists have experimentally determined that the yeast S. cerevisiae has a significant influence on regional variations in wine flavor and smell.

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Podcast Review: “The Infinite Monkey Cage” Delights All Audiences

Podcast Review: “The Infinite Monkey Cage” Delights All Audiences

“When is a strawberry dead?” This quirky question is one of many that have sparked debates on BBC Radio 4’s science-meets-entertainment podcast, “The Infinite Monkey Cage.” It is indicative of the show’s character — nonsensical musings intertwined with a surprising

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Mosquitoes Resistant to Malaria: Scientists investigate the innate immune response in Anopheles gambiae

Mosquitoes Resistant to Malaria: Scientists investigate the innate immune response in Anopheles gambiae

Anopheles gambiae is professor Richard Baxter’s insect of interest, and it is easy to see why: The mosquito species found in sub-Saharan Africa excels at transmitting malaria, one of the deadliest infectious diseases. “[Malaria] is a scourge of the developing

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Lupus-causing Agent Shows Potential for Cancer Treatment

Lupus-causing Agent Shows Potential for Cancer Treatment

Some of the world’s deadliest diseases manifest when the body begins to betray itself. In cancer, mutated cells proliferate and overrun normal ones. Lupus, an autoimmune disease, occurs when the body’s immune system begins to attack its own cells. But

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Promising Protein Illuminates Complexities of Neurons

Promising Protein Illuminates Complexities of Neurons

ArcLight, a protein that serves as a fluorescent tag for genes and that can be used to monitor the action potentials of neurons, offers a new way for scientists to understand how nerve cells operate and communicate. Traditionally, calcium sensors

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The Protein Exterminators: PROTACs offer alternative to current drug treatments

The Protein Exterminators: PROTACs offer alternative to current drug treatments

The Crews lab at Yale has developed variations on a class of proteins called PROTACs, which destroy rogue proteins within cancerous cells. Craig Crews has even created a company to bridge the gap between research and the real world.

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