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Tag "Cell Biology"

It’s What’s on the Outside that Counts

It’s What’s on the Outside that Counts

When we think about disease, we often wonder what has changed insideaffected cells. Yet, perhaps taking a look at the surrounding environment is just as important. In the case of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), a disease marked by thickening of the

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Killing Cancerous Cells: Using Genetically Engineered T-Cells to Target Tumors

Killing Cancerous Cells: Using Genetically Engineered T-Cells to Target Tumors

Cancer is estimated to affect forty percent of individuals in the United States at some point in their lifetimes. Cancer is marked by rapid, unchecked cell growth and proliferation, which has led researchers to investigate and refine cytotoxic, or cell-killing,

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Repairing Tissue with Sleeping Cells: How Stromal and Fibroblast Cocultures Encourage Blood Vessel Formation

Repairing Tissue with Sleeping Cells: How Stromal and Fibroblast Cocultures Encourage Blood Vessel Formation

Wound healing and tissue repair often require the growth of new tissue. However, the main issue with current methods of tissue engineering is developing an adequate vasculature network to support it. Newly created tissues require the growth of a robust

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Cellular Forces Altering the Extracellular Matrix

Cellular Forces Altering the Extracellular Matrix

Through biophysics, a field that takes an interdisciplinary approach to the study of biological processes, researchers have been able to make great progress in understanding cells, the building blocks of our lives. In studying the underlying biophysics and mechanics of

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The Game of Cancer: Evolutionary game theory offers new insights in cancer biology

The Game of Cancer: Evolutionary game theory offers new insights in cancer biology

Evolutionary game theory, the application of game theory to evolutionary biology, may provide new insights on how cancer behaves. Earlier this year, a team from the Moffitt Cancer Center, led by Artem Kaznatcheev and Jacob G. Scott, who are currently

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Listening to Cells

Listening to Cells

Cells hold key information for understanding the human body, particularly for diseases associated with cell development. For many years, researchers have struggled to measure cell mechanics without destroying the cell. Most methodologies require squeezing the cell and watching it deform.

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Follow the Energy, See Where it Goes: Investigating the energetic expenditures of embryonic cleavage divisions

Follow the Energy, See Where it Goes: Investigating the energetic expenditures of embryonic cleavage divisions

Energy is a tricky concept. The term is bandied around within and without science; even among scientists, “ener­gy” takes different meanings in different contexts. Though it is far from straight­forward to define what energy actually is, more important is what

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Watching Actin in Action: Unveiling new discoveries about our cytoskeleton

Watching Actin in Action: Unveiling new discoveries about our cytoskeleton

Just like complex vertebrates, cells are sup­ported by their own kind of skeleton. In fact, the cell’s skeleton, called the cytoskeleton, is very dynamic—the constituent “bones” can assemble and disassemble as required. One key player in the cytoskeleton is the

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Regulating Obesity: Specialized brain cells promote fat storage in mice

Regulating Obesity: Specialized brain cells promote fat storage in mice

Obesity is an increasingly common and significant health concern that affects greater than one in three adults in the United States. It can cause numerous complications, including heart disease, diabe­tes, or cancer. Development of obesity is the result of an

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One Neuron Remembering a Memory

One Neuron Remembering a Memory

Most people prefer sitting in a room with AC than sitting in a hot field.  Research scientist Josh Hawk and his team study the neural mechanisms behind remembering and acting upon temperature preference memories like these, except they study this

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