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Tag "Earth and Environment"

Yale Graduate Challenges Existing Ideas About Ecosystem Models

Yale Graduate Challenges Existing Ideas About Ecosystem Models

Plant functional traits are viewed as key to predicting important ecosystem and community properties among biogeographic regions. However, a recent study led by Elisabeth Forrestel GRD ’15 challenges the trait-based approach to predicting ecosystem function by demonstrating that different combinations of functional traits can act to maximize net primary productivity, a community property, in a given environmental setting.

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Silly Bacteria: Tricks are for Kids

Silly Bacteria: Tricks are for Kids

The influence of pathogens, either directly or indirectly, to manipulate vector microbiota for their own benefit, has not been very well described. This study has demonstrated that a pathogen can effectively “trick” vector microbiota and enhance infection. This allows better colonization of the vector.

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Young Professional Profile: Mika McKinnon, UBC M.S. ‘10

Young Professional Profile: Mika McKinnon, UBC M.S. ‘10

What do television shows, outer space, earthquakes and journalism have in common? Ask Mika McKinnon, a Canadian-born geophysicist currently residing in the San Francisco area; she has consulted on the television series Stargate, written for science and tech publications like

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Q&A: Why Do Killer Whales Go Through Menopause?

Q&A: Why Do Killer Whales Go Through Menopause?

Why do some species, including humans and killer whales, stop reproducing long before the end of their lives? A new study from Exeter University suggests that older females may gain adaptive advantages by helping to raise their daughters’ calves instead of raising their own.

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Q&A: What’s killing our honeybees?

Q&A: What’s killing our honeybees?

Researchers from Penn State have found that a class of chemicals formerly thought to be inert may actually be accelerating honeybee mortality.

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The Powerpuff Sponges: Sea sponges solve problems in structural engineering

The Powerpuff Sponges: Sea sponges solve problems in structural engineering

Deceptively flimsy, sea sponges may just be the key to stronger and more effective material design. Michael Monn and Haneesh Kesari investigated the structure properties of the rod-like spicules that give the sponges their shape and found that their tapered shape makes them 33% less likely to buckle under pressure.

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Discovering Why the Caged Bird Sings

Discovering Why the Caged Bird Sings

Researchers led by Professor Richard Carson, Director of the Yale PET Center, have found a link between the hormone corticosterone and stress-related behavior in captured wild birds. The study opens up new questions about how wild animals adapt to captivity and its stresses.

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Plastic Preys on Deep-Sea Organisms

Plastic Preys on Deep-Sea Organisms

A marine study at the University of Oxford illuminates the extent of plastic pollution in our oceans by probing deep-sea organisms instead of organisms from more-commonly-studied aquatic environments.

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A World of Wonder: Opening the David Friend Hall at the Peabody Museum

A World of Wonder: Opening the David Friend Hall at the Peabody Museum

A series of dazzling crystals and minerals are now on display in the David Friend Hall of the Peabody Museum. The display sets a high standard for natural history museums around the world.

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Q&A: CO2 Past the Point of No Return?

Q&A: CO2 Past the Point of No Return?

Climate change has begun, and there’s evidence to prove it. Around the world scientists have recorded atmospheric CO2 above 400 parts per million, a level defined as the ceiling for safe CO2 concentrations.

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