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Tag "Earth and Environment"

The Frogs in Your Suburb: Suburbanization increases the prevalence of deadly infections in frogs

The Frogs in Your Suburb: Suburbanization increases the prevalence of deadly infections in frogs

Since its rise in the 1950s, suburbanization has become a defining part of American culture, with fifty-two percent of Americans living in suburbs as of 2017. Despite their popularity, these seemingly picture-perfect neighborhoods are, in reality, fraught with a long

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Nature’s Electrical Engineers: The Discovery of Bacterial Nanowire Composition and Structure

Nature’s Electrical Engineers: The Discovery of Bacterial Nanowire Composition and Structure

Picture this: Mother Nature, safety glasses on, soldering iron in hand. If Mother Nature held any occupation, few would suggest that she would be an electrical engineer. Yet, the mere existence of Geobacter suggests that we should reconsider.Geobacter are common

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Not so Hot! Reevaluating the temperature of ancient oceans

Not so Hot! Reevaluating the temperature of ancient oceans

Do you ever get discouraged by how long it takes to change the temperature of the water in your bath tub? Well, it could be worse. Imagine how long it would take to change the temperature of an entire ocean

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How do Plants Tell Time?

How do Plants Tell Time?

Circadian rhythms are biological clocks that regulate all organisms’ day-night cycles. Professor Josh Gendron and his team recently shed light on how Arabiposis plants regulate their circadian clocks according to sunlight exposure. Although it was known that when Zeitlupe (ZTL)—photoreceptor

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Digit Evolution: Debate over bird wing development

Digit Evolution: Debate over bird wing development

Wiggle your fingers. There should be ten of them. Now wiggle your toes. Still ten, right? We’re obviously not the only species that have digits. Birds have digits too. However, the development of their digits and consequently their wings is

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Stubborn Salt Marshes: Nitrate Contamination Prevents Efficient CO2 Processing

Stubborn Salt Marshes: Nitrate Contamination Prevents Efficient CO2 Processing

Due to human activity, carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere continue to rise, contributing to increased global temperatures, rising sea levels, and other devastating environmental consequences. Salt marshes, widely found in coastal regions, are known to reduce CO2 levels by

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Slime: How Algae Created Us, Plague Us, and Just Might Save Us

Slime: How Algae Created Us, Plague Us, and Just Might Save Us

How much do you think about algae? Unless you regularly eat seaweed snacks, likely not much. However, algae—albeit green and slimy—is more than meets the eye, and this tiny organism might even have an important role in shaping our future.

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The Origins of Water in Earth: Meteorites offer insight on the early conditions of Earth

The Origins of Water in Earth: Meteorites offer insight on the early conditions of Earth

Earth is remarkable in countless ways, but particularly for providing a home to the only known living creatures in the universe. That Earth has the building blocks for life is extraordinary, but how did these circumstances come about? New research

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Shazam for Seismologists? How a new data mining technique is shaking up earthquake science

Shazam for Seismologists? How a new data mining technique is shaking up earthquake science

Have you ever experienced an earth­quake? Because many earthquakes are small and can go by unnoticed, the answer for most people is yes. A common miscon­ception about earthquakes is that they are always associated with ruptured pavement, collapsed buildings, and

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An Unlikely Partnership: Why a parasitic relationship became mutualistic

An Unlikely Partnership: Why a parasitic relationship became mutualistic

When we think about bacteriophages, we don’t typically think of cooperation. Commonly represented with six legs and a big “head”, bacteriophages can look more like a bug than a microbial predator. Bacteriophages, a type of virus, attack by injecting their

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