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Tag "Earth and Environment"

Q&A: Can Evaporation Drive Energy Production?

Q&A: Can Evaporation Drive Energy Production?

Scientists are looking into using the evaporation of lakes as a new energy resource.

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A False Fixation on Nitrogen: How nitrogen-fixing trees may slow forest regrowth

A False Fixation on Nitrogen: How nitrogen-fixing trees may slow forest regrowth

Understanding forest regrowth is crucial to predicting and mitigating environmental damage, and with over half of the word’s tropical forests currently recovering from human land use, insight into forest regrowth mechanisms is more important than ever. To accurately model and

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Pesticides, Honey, and Dead Bees: Global honey contamination with neonicotinoids

Pesticides, Honey, and Dead Bees: Global honey contamination with neonicotinoids

A team of researchers from University and Botanical Garden of Neuchâtel constructed a global map of honey exposure to a class of pesticides termed “neonics,” showing that 75% of all samples were contaminated with the pesticides.

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Solarizing Through Social Networks

Solarizing Through Social Networks

Installing solar panels can be contagious. Dr. Kenneth Gillingham of Yale’s School of Forestry and Environmental Studies researches how solar adoption campaigns in Connecticut can take advantage of the peer effects of solar installation.

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Hot and Cold: Effect of Temperature on Virus Transmission

Hot and Cold: Effect of Temperature on Virus Transmission

Local temperatures influence viral infection rates in mosquitos. Yale researchers in the department of ecology and evolutionary biology find a new link between temperature and mosquito and viral genotypes, providing more clues to successfully predict viral outbreaks.

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Lyme and Punishment: How Human Activity May Affect the Spread of Lyme disease

Lyme and Punishment: How Human Activity May Affect the Spread of Lyme disease

Contrary to the popular Plum Island conspiracy, Lyme disease may have origins some 60,000 years in the past.

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Cayo Santiago: No Monkeying Around

Cayo Santiago: No Monkeying Around

In the aftermath of Hurricane Maria, researchers are striving to save the unique monkey population near Puerto Rico.

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When the Weakest Survive: How weak competitors provide resilience to climate change

When the Weakest Survive: How weak competitors provide resilience to climate change

Survival of the fittest isn’t the end of the story. New research by Yale scientists shows that weak species are able to grow with stronger species, and the presence of weak species may help ecosystems respond to climate change.

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Hermit Crabs: Shift in Mutualism

Hermit Crabs: Shift in Mutualism

Hermit crabs are typically associated with occupying molluscan shells. However, a newly discovered species of hermit crab in the Oshima Strait was found inhabiting walking corals; these corals were previously thought to house only sipunculan worms.

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Undergraduate Profile: Peter Wang (TD ’18): A Modern-Day Renaissance Man

Undergraduate Profile: Peter Wang (TD ’18): A Modern-Day Renaissance Man

Peter Wang is a current senior majoring in Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology. While at Yale, he’s done it all—from publishing a paper in ACS Biochemistry to going on a month-long solo journey through Europe.

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