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Tag "Engineering and Technology"

Making the most of twists and turns: Harvesting mechanical energy with carbon nanotube yarns

Making the most of twists and turns: Harvesting mechanical energy with carbon nanotube yarns

American and South Korean scientists have developed carbon nanotube yarns that convert twisting and stretching motions into electrical signals. The applications range from wearable sensors to harnessing the energy of ocean waves.

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Brilliant Bacteria: Programming Bacteria to Make Materials

Brilliant Bacteria: Programming Bacteria to Make Materials

Researchers at Duke have used synthetic biology techniques to engineer bacteria to produce a protein capable of constructing an electronic pressure sensor when supplemented with gold nanoparticles. With a variety of future applications, this technology will diversify how we use microorganisms in biophysical systems.

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Real-Time Imaging of Dynamic Surfaces: A new microscope images surfaces 5000 times faster

Real-Time Imaging of Dynamic Surfaces: A new microscope images surfaces 5000 times faster

Researchers at the École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Switzerland, have constructed a new microscope that can be used to observe chemical reactions on surfaces at the molecular level, 5000 times faster than current microscopes.

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Solarizing Through Social Networks

Solarizing Through Social Networks

Installing solar panels can be contagious. Dr. Kenneth Gillingham of Yale’s School of Forestry and Environmental Studies researches how solar adoption campaigns in Connecticut can take advantage of the peer effects of solar installation.

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Yale Startup Hopes to Deploy Pipe-Inspecting Robots

Yale Startup Hopes to Deploy Pipe-Inspecting Robots

How are robots changing the field of the petroleum refineries? Find out how Yale startup ARIX is making its breaking through in cutting costs and improving safety in the oil and gas industry.

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The Search: Mathematical model explains diversity in cancer cell movement

The Search: Mathematical model explains diversity in cancer cell movement

If cancer cells can’t find the highways of the body, they can’t spread and become more lethal. A mathematical model developed by Andre Levchenko and JinSeok Park of the Yale Systems Biology Institute provides a framework to explain cell migration behavior that can be implemented down the line to keep cells searching longer.

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Harnessing the Sun for Clean Water

Harnessing the Sun for Clean Water

Yale researchers have developed a small-scale, solar-powered water purification system using nanotechnology. The design, created in collaboration with the Nanotechnology Enabled Water Treatment Systems center, is intended to provide clean water in off-grid scenarios, such as rural areas and disaster zones.

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Hardware Security “Fingerprints”

Hardware Security “Fingerprints”

Yale Professor Jakub Szefer has received a National Science Foundation award for his project to improve electronic security. The research uses distinctive hardware features, found in our everyday electronic devices, which gives each device a unique “fingerprint” that can be used for authentication purposes.

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Upgrading CO2

Upgrading CO2

As global warming accelerates, researchers are exploring methods to mitigate these effects, such as changing carbon dioxide into more useful reactions. Yueshen Wu, a PhD student at Yale, invented a new method of converting carbon dioxide into a useful chemical feedstock.

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Printing Power Generators

Printing Power Generators

Researchers at the University of Toronto have designed a technology that could make solar cells more effective and cheaper to produce.

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