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Tag "Engineering and Technology"

Holding onto Energy: New insights into lithium sulfur batteries

Holding onto Energy: New insights into lithium sulfur batteries

Batteries have revolutionized modern life. Now, there is a push for bat­teries to undergo their own revolution. The electronics we use on a dai­ly basis run on lithium-ion batteries, but a new battery with lower cost and higher energy density

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Wrap it, Wear it, Robotic?

Wrap it, Wear it, Robotic?

What if there existed a gadget that could take an inanimate object and turn it into life? Researchers at Yale have been imagining and working on robotic skins that do just this. Rebecca Kramer-Bottiglio, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering &

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Do Self-Driving Cars Have Morals?

Do Self-Driving Cars Have Morals?

With the rise of self-driving cars has come the grim reality that cars may have to choose between saving one life and ending another. Unlike a reckless human driver, an autonomous vehicle itself cannot be held legally or morally responsible

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Robotic Role Models Show Therapeutic Promise

Robotic Role Models Show Therapeutic Promise

We often take for granted our ability to detect social cues such as facial expressions and body language. For many children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD),  this social-communicative ability is not innate and instead must be learned. Unfortunately, most

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Membranes Versus Microbes: How Yale and Shandong University researchers are zapping antibiotic-resistant bacteria in our water supply

Membranes Versus Microbes: How Yale and Shandong University researchers are zapping antibiotic-resistant bacteria in our water supply

Fishing can be quite the challenge, even for the experienced fisherman. The challenge of removing every live fish from the ocean thus seems rather silly. It becomes even more difficult when the problem is scaled down to the world of

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The Man Behind The Camera

The Man Behind The Camera

Alumni Profile: Eric Fossum (PhD ’84) Professor Eric Fossum (PhD ’84), 2018 recipient of the Yale Science & Engineering Association Award for Advancement of Basic and Applied Science, compares his work as an image sensor device physicist and engineer to

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Making the most of twists and turns: Harvesting mechanical energy with carbon nanotube yarns

Making the most of twists and turns: Harvesting mechanical energy with carbon nanotube yarns

American and South Korean scientists have developed carbon nanotube yarns that convert twisting and stretching motions into electrical signals. The applications range from wearable sensors to harnessing the energy of ocean waves.

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Brilliant Bacteria: Programming Bacteria to Make Materials

Brilliant Bacteria: Programming Bacteria to Make Materials

Researchers at Duke have used synthetic biology techniques to engineer bacteria to produce a protein capable of constructing an electronic pressure sensor when supplemented with gold nanoparticles. With a variety of future applications, this technology will diversify how we use microorganisms in biophysical systems.

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Real-Time Imaging of Dynamic Surfaces: A new microscope images surfaces 5000 times faster

Real-Time Imaging of Dynamic Surfaces: A new microscope images surfaces 5000 times faster

Researchers at the École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Switzerland, have constructed a new microscope that can be used to observe chemical reactions on surfaces at the molecular level, 5000 times faster than current microscopes.

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Solarizing Through Social Networks

Solarizing Through Social Networks

Installing solar panels can be contagious. Dr. Kenneth Gillingham of Yale’s School of Forestry and Environmental Studies researches how solar adoption campaigns in Connecticut can take advantage of the peer effects of solar installation.

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