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Tag "Evolutionary Biology"

Game of Sperms

Game of Sperms

Why do males in some species care for children that are not their own? A new Yale study explains the reasons behind these actions.

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The Twists And Turns Of Flowers

The Twists And Turns Of Flowers

A molecule in your jam plays a role in the twisting of flower petals. Yale Professor of Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology, Vivian Irish, studies how a genetic mutation causes epidermal cells and flower organs to twist.

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Something’s Fishy

Something’s Fishy

Diverse fish from Antarctica now face rising temperatures and increased competition from invading species.

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Microbial Diversity: How environmental niches affect biological diversification

Microbial Diversity: How environmental niches affect biological diversification

By studying rocks that are almost three million years old, a team of researchers led by Eva Stüeken found out that the diversification of environmental niches plays a role in the diversification of microbial populations.

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Decoding the Largest Mammalian Genome

Decoding the Largest Mammalian Genome

Think that you have a large genome? Think again. The red vizcacha rat from Argentina is known to have a genome size almost three times larger than that of humans, and researchers have unearthed new data about this intriguing phenomenon.

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A Gecko Opera: Reptile Vocal Plasticity and the Lombard Effect

A Gecko Opera: Reptile Vocal Plasticity and the Lombard Effect

Humans, and many other animals, reflexively increase the volume of their vocalizations in a noisy environment, a phenomenon called the Lombard effect. A new study on geckos, one of the first to examine vocal plasticity in a reptile, found that while geckos do not exhibit the Lombard effect, they do modify their calls in other ways so as to more easily be heard over noise.

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Q&A: Why did turtles come out of their shells?

Q&A: Why did turtles come out of their shells?

A study in Switzerland challenges our most basic understanding of the turtle, suggesting that it evolved head retraction as a means of predation rather than protection.

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Spiny Slugs: New fossil discovery sheds light on mollusk evolution

Spiny Slugs: New fossil discovery sheds light on mollusk evolution

Discovery of a slug-like organism called Calvipilosa, literally meaning “hairy scalp”, leads to new knowledge of what the earliest common ancestor of mollusks would have looked like.

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Deadlier Diseases

Deadlier Diseases

Yale Professor Paul Turner’s lab investigated the effect of rates of environmental change on virus mutation. The study results contribute to knowledge that will ultimately help scientists predict virus evolution and disease emergence, potentially preventing outbreaks and saving lives.

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Modern Animals with Ancient Genes: Testing the causes of evolution

Modern Animals with Ancient Genes: Testing the causes of evolution

It was once thought fruit flies can process more alcohol than their sister species because of a difference in their genome. Now, a collaboration between evolutionary and molecular biologists is challenging this hypothesis by putting ancient genes in modern fruit flies

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