Evolutionary Biology »

Fossils Reveal that Many Marine Reptiles Separately Joined the Dark Side

Fossils Reveal that Many Marine Reptiles Separately Joined the Dark Side

William Gearty March 25, 2014 0

New fossil remains of prehistoric reptiles shine light on the dark coloration of their skin. These distinct pigmentations may have played key ecological roles in these distantly related animals

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Vikings: Savages or Social Butterflies?

Vikings: Savages or Social Butterflies?

Elena Malloy December 25, 2013 1

Historians have recorded numerous Viking invasions in medieval Europe, but are the Vikings simply savage barbarians? Using statistical mechanical tools to analyze ancient texts, scientists have discovered that Vikings formed complex social networks.

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The Cambrian Explosion: Evolution’s Big Bang

The Cambrian Explosion: Evolution’s Big Bang

William Gearty December 23, 2013 0

The origins of insects, spiders, scorpions, crustaceans, and their relatives date to more than 500 million years ago, a period termed the Cambrian Explosion, when most of the modern groups of arthropods first occurred.

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Human Activity Boosts Brain Size in Animals

Human Activity Boosts Brain Size in Animals

Stephanie Mao December 21, 2013 0

A new study at the University of Minnesota suggests that human activity may be driving local mammals to develop bigger brains.

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A Whole New World: Scientists discover abundant viruses living under the sea

A Whole New World: Scientists discover abundant viruses living under the sea

Payal Marathe December 21, 2013 0

Only in the past decade have scientists begun exploring the rich underwater world of marine viruses, but they are quickly realizing how diverse and abundant these saltwater microbes really are. Recent findings show that

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Fish Larvae Smell Their Way Back Home

Fish Larvae Smell Their Way Back Home

Lisa Zheng December 20, 2013 0

Dr. Claire Paris of the University of Miami has discovered that fish larvae detect odor signals from their home reef and use these signals to help pilot their way back home

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Giving Anatomy a Chance: Finding the Most Recent Common Ancestor of Placental Mammals

Giving Anatomy a Chance: Finding the Most Recent Common Ancestor of Placental Mammals

Elisa Visher May 30, 2013 1

Researchers, including Yale’s Eric Sargis, have used anatomical data to reconstruct a phylogeny of placental mammals. Using these data, they have determined a date of divergence for placental mammals, reconstructed what the most recent

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125-Million-Year-Old Biplanes: New Evidence Suggests the Earliest Bird Species Had Feathers on their Hind Limbs

125-Million-Year-Old Biplanes: New Evidence Suggests the Earliest Bird Species Had Feathers on their Hind Limbs

William Gearty May 29, 2013 0

The recent discovery of fossilized birds in China leads scientists to believe that the earliest birds may have possessed four wings, as opposed to the two wings of all modern birds. However, scientists are

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The Human Population Explosion

The Human Population Explosion

Sophie Janaskie May 11, 2013 0

The world’s human population, once relatively constant at 300 million people, is currently expanding at a rate of 1.4 percent per year. This rapid rate of growth has serious ramifications for the environment and

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Google Maps Meets Biodiversity: A New Interactive Map of Life Aims to Integrate Biodiversity Distribution Knowledge

Google Maps Meets Biodiversity: A New Interactive Map of Life Aims to Integrate Biodiversity Distribution Knowledge

William Gearty May 11, 2013 0

The Earth is a dynamic system, covered with species constantly moving across its surface in time and space. Yale Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Walter Jetz has begun work on a new system

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