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Tag "Evolutionary Biology"

Cooperating to Understand Cooperation

Cooperating to Understand Cooperation

The question of whether humans are inherently selfish or selfless has long been a struggle to answer. Yale Ph.D. candidate Adam Bear and Professor David Rand strive to explain human behavior of cooperation and selfishness with a theoretical game theory model.

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Tight Jeans? Don’t Blame Your Genes

Tight Jeans? Don’t Blame Your Genes

Contrary to the first hypothesis about the increased prevalence of obesity and type two diabetes, humans did not evolve to increase fat storage. More likely, the recent rise in metabolic diseases results from epigenetic factors and the gut microbiome.

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The Red King Effect: Winning the Co-evolutionary Race

The Red King Effect: Winning the Co-evolutionary Race

A study conducted at the University of Chicago on ant-plant relationships has challenged the theory that organisms in a mutualistic relationship evolve at a slower rate than non-mutualists.

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Perplexing Fossils and Peculiar Forms: Mapping the Tully Monster onto the Tree of Life

Perplexing Fossils and Peculiar Forms: Mapping the Tully Monster onto the Tree of Life

Researchers from Yale University and other institutions, headed by Dr. Victoria McCoy, have unearthed the origins of the Tully Monster, a Carboniferous creature with highly unusual morphology.

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Lucy [Falling Through] the Sky with Diamonds: Compressive fractures suggest cause of early hominin’s death

Lucy [Falling Through] the Sky with Diamonds: Compressive fractures suggest cause of early hominin’s death

One of the oldest cold cases in history is the death of Lucy, the 3.2-million-year-old hominin. John Kappelman, who completed his undergraduate training at Yale, did some detective work on Lucy’s skeleton; an analysis of her bone fractures revealed that she may have died from falling out of a tree.

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A Real-life “Jurassic World”:  Recreating Historic Evolutionary Transitions in the Laboratory

A Real-life “Jurassic World”: Recreating Historic Evolutionary Transitions in the Laboratory

Rather than speculate on how organisms evolved certain adaptations, scientists are attempting to recreate some of these historic transitions—such as the development of fins into feet—in the lab.

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Modern Hunter-Gatherers Reveal Strategies for Adaptive Energy Use

Modern Hunter-Gatherers Reveal Strategies for Adaptive Energy Use

The World Health Organization attributes obesity in developed countries to decreases in exercise and energy expenditure relative to our hunter-gatherer ancestors. Where they led active lifestyles, ours are mostly sedentary. In recent research, Yale professor Brian Wood examined total energy

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Unraveling the Mysteries of Genetic Evolution: How promoter mutations may factor in

Unraveling the Mysteries of Genetic Evolution: How promoter mutations may factor in

Evolution as we know it is driven by mutations in genes. But researchers at Yale were curious about what surrounds a gene. That is, how does a whole gene network evolve?

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Salmonella enterica Forego the Flagella: Yale researchers find new moves in bacterial choreography

Salmonella enterica Forego the Flagella: Yale researchers find new moves in bacterial choreography

New Yale research reveals how Salmonella bacteria move when flagella are of no use, adding dimensions to our understanding of bacterial choreography.

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Science or Science Fiction? Uplifting Animals

Science or Science Fiction? Uplifting Animals

Uplifting animals, or endowing animals with near-human intelligence, is a concept that has been explored by science fiction writers and movie producers. But real world scientists are interested, too. New research suggests that genetic and neurological modifications could enhance animals’ intelligence.

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