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Tag "Genetics"

A New Map of the Body: Profiling Gene Expression Levels across Human Tissues

A New Map of the Body: Profiling Gene Expression Levels across Human Tissues

The Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) project aims to characterize the gene expression profiles of different human tissues. The resulting gene expression map could help clarify how genetic variations work at a molecular level to influence gene expression.

Hiding Transplants from Our Immune Systems: Nanoparticles deliver gene-suppressor, decreasing risk of transplant rejection

Hiding Transplants from Our Immune Systems: Nanoparticles deliver gene-suppressor, decreasing risk of transplant rejection

Yale researchers develop a nanoparticle delivery system that releases a siRNA capable of protecting transplanted organs from rejection by the immune system. The nanoparticles have the potential to inhibit immune system’s recognition of transplants.

How was Wheat Domesticated?

How was Wheat Domesticated?

Researchers at Tel Aviv University have been studying the genomics of wheat to determine how it was domesticated.

Nature and Nurture: Reclassifying diseases by genetic and environmental factors

Nature and Nurture: Reclassifying diseases by genetic and environmental factors

A comparison of genetic and environmental correlations between twenty-nine diseases reveals unforeseen similarities that transform both the classification and potentially treatments of complex diseases.

Game of Sperms

Game of Sperms

Why do males in some species care for children that are not their own? A new Yale study explains the reasons behind these actions.

The Twists And Turns Of Flowers

The Twists And Turns Of Flowers

A molecule in your jam plays a role in the twisting of flower petals. Yale Professor of Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology, Vivian Irish, studies how a genetic mutation causes epidermal cells and flower organs to twist.

A Reason to Make Cancer Cells Nervous

A Reason to Make Cancer Cells Nervous

An altered form of CRISPR has allowed a Yale-led team of scientists to identify not just the genes linked to the deadly brain cancer glioblastoma, but the actual, specific combinations of genes that directly cause the cancer. They believe their approach can be applied to other cancers, thus enhancing the specificity and effectiveness of our treatments.

The Inflammation Question in Pregnancy

The Inflammation Question in Pregnancy

Inflammation during pregnancy is both essential and threatening. Researchers at Yale have uncovered the evolutionary history of this paradoxical response and believe it to be the next step in improving assisted reproductive technologies.

Decoding the Largest Mammalian Genome

Decoding the Largest Mammalian Genome

Think that you have a large genome? Think again. The red vizcacha rat from Argentina is known to have a genome size almost three times larger than that of humans, and researchers have unearthed new data about this intriguing phenomenon.

Q&A: Three’s a Crowd—How can a baby have three parents?

Q&A: Three’s a Crowd—How can a baby have three parents?

For parents whose children are at risk of inheriting a mitochondrial disorder, genetic material from a third person can help them conceive a healthy child. Mitochondria are maternally inherited organelles, so if a mother’s mitochondrial DNA is mutated, her children