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Tag "Health and Medicine"

Watching Your Health with Wearables: Detecting Illnesses with Smartwatches

Watching Your Health with Wearables: Detecting Illnesses with Smartwatches

The Snyder Lab at Stanford is working on an algorithm that uses medical data from wearable biosensors like smartwatches to detect when people get sick. Their research could completely change the way we diagnose and treat diseases.

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Q&A: Why Do Killer Whales Go Through Menopause?

Why do some species, including humans and killer whales, stop reproducing long before the end of their lives? A new study from Exeter University suggests that older females may gain adaptive advantages by helping to raise their daughters’ calves instead of raising their own.

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Growing a Lung in Culture: New bioreactor system allows crucial oxygen exchange.

Growing a Lung in Culture: New bioreactor system allows crucial oxygen exchange.

A new whole-lung bioreactor system involving the maintenance and delivery of oxygen to the lungs was developed by Yale Professor of Biomedical Engineering Laura Niklason. This system looks to optimize the processes of growing lungs in bioreactors and enables the real-time monitoring of oxygen intake and cell proliferation in the lung.

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Unlikely Friendships: Gut Bacteria Edition

Unlikely Friendships: Gut Bacteria Edition

Researchers study the guts of insects to uncover how a symbiotic microbe develops a part of the tsetse fly’s immune system. This finding raises the importance of understanding the role of bacterial species in the human microbiome.

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Finding NoBody, Your Cell’s Secret Housekeeping Protein

Finding NoBody, Your Cell’s Secret Housekeeping Protein

This recently discovered microprotein has the ability to remove excess genetic material in cells. Researchers are only beginning to explore its potential.

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Targeted at the Checkpoint: How memory cells could be the future of cancer treatment

Targeted at the Checkpoint: How memory cells could be the future of cancer treatment

A special type of memory T cell could be used as an immunotherapy tool to efficiently eliminate tumors.

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The Hunt Is On: Mapping brain patterns during predatory hunting

Using a technique called optogenetics, researchers at Yale have identified the region of the brain critical for predatory hunting. At the switch of a button, the researchers manipulated when the docile mice transformed into voracious hunters.

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The Fa(c)t of the Matter: How Fat Cells Regenerate — In a Good Way

The Fa(c)t of the Matter: How Fat Cells Regenerate — In a Good Way

Up until recently, very little has been understood about fat cell growth and maintenance. A new Yale study shines some light on the molecular mechanisms behind these processes, paving the way for future research.

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Treating Autism Case by Case: Innovative personalized treatment methods for Autism Spectrum Disorders

Following developments elsewhere in the field of treatment, like the increasingly specific cancer medications and therapies that target specific cells unique to each type of cancer, researchers at the Child Study Center are finding ways to personalize autism medicine. In the future, treatment could be tailored to fit the needs of each individual patient.

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Cancer Treatment: More is Not Always Better?

Cancer Treatment: More is Not Always Better?

Surgical tumor removal has been the go-to cancer treatment for decades. Yale School of Medicine challenges surgery’s place as the most effective treatment of cancer with unexpected research results.

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