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Tag "Medicine"

Targeted at the Checkpoint: How memory cells could be the future of cancer treatment

Targeted at the Checkpoint: How memory cells could be the future of cancer treatment

A special type of memory T cell could be used as an immunotherapy tool to efficiently eliminate tumors.

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Treating Autism Case by Case: Innovative personalized treatment methods for Autism Spectrum Disorders

Following developments elsewhere in the field of treatment, like the increasingly specific cancer medications and therapies that target specific cells unique to each type of cancer, researchers at the Child Study Center are finding ways to personalize autism medicine. In the future, treatment could be tailored to fit the needs of each individual patient.

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Cancer Treatment: More is Not Always Better?

Cancer Treatment: More is Not Always Better?

Surgical tumor removal has been the go-to cancer treatment for decades. Yale School of Medicine challenges surgery’s place as the most effective treatment of cancer with unexpected research results.

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Insight into Eyesight: Reawakening Retinal Stem Cells

Insight into Eyesight: Reawakening Retinal Stem Cells

Dr. Bo Chen and his team of researchers at Yale University have figured out a way to activate the stem cell ability of MGs, a special group of glial cells in the retina. Their discovery could someday help restore eyesight to patients whose retinas have been damaged by disease.

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Superbugs See Stars: Polymer nanotechnology may finally overcome antibiotic resistance

Superbugs See Stars: Polymer nanotechnology may finally overcome antibiotic resistance

Antibiotic-resistant bacteria are an ever-increasing global health concern, but one team of scientists from Melbourne have brought us closer to a solution with tiny, star-shaped polymers that may prove more effective at killing bacteria than any antibiotic drug ever has.

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Bull’s Eye: Targeted Immunotherapy of Myasthenia Gravis

Bull’s Eye: Targeted Immunotherapy of Myasthenia Gravis

Myasthenia gravis is a motor disease, starting with muscular pain and potentially escalating to failure of vital muscles such as the diaphragm. Like other autoimmune diseases, it was historically treated with steroids, which suppress the immune system overall. Professor Richard Nowak at the Yale School of Medicine has found a much more targeted attack strategy.

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A New Tool for Pediatricians: Yale team develops simulation to improve pediatric emergency care

A New Tool for Pediatricians: Yale team develops simulation to improve pediatric emergency care

Pediatric patients received better quality of care in pediatric emergency departments compared with general emergency departments. A Yale team developed simulation to study why patient outcomes in quality vary and how to improve quality of emergency care for pediatric patients.

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Daily Aspirin Use Links with Pancreatic Cancer Prevention

Daily Aspirin Use Links with Pancreatic Cancer Prevention

A new study led by the Yale School of Public Health suggests that regular use of aspirin can effectively reduce pancreatic cancer risk by 50%.

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Alumni Profile: Dr. Ralph Greco, M.D. ‘68

Alumni Profile: Dr. Ralph Greco, M.D. ‘68

Dr. Ralph Greco is a talented Yale alumnus helping to create healthier physicians.

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Q&A: Three’s a Crowd—How can a baby have three parents?

Q&A: Three’s a Crowd—How can a baby have three parents?

For parents whose children are at risk of inheriting a mitochondrial disorder, genetic material from a third person can help them conceive a healthy child. Mitochondria are maternally inherited organelles, so if a mother’s mitochondrial DNA is mutated, her children

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