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Tag "Medicine"

Regulating Obesity: Specialized brain cells promote fat storage in mice

Regulating Obesity: Specialized brain cells promote fat storage in mice

Obesity is an increasingly common and significant health concern that affects greater than one in three adults in the United States. It can cause numerous complications, including heart disease, diabe­tes, or cancer. Development of obesity is the result of an

A Surprising Shield: Previous dengue exposure protects against Zika

A Surprising Shield: Previous dengue exposure protects against Zika

In Pau da Lima, the Brazilian epicenter of the 2015-2016 Zika epidemic, over seventy percent of the population was infected. Yet, across distances as small as twenty meters, there were large variations in risk of Zika infection. This differential immunity

Alumni Profile: Esther Choo (JE ’94, MD ’01)

Alumni Profile: Esther Choo (JE ’94, MD ’01)

Dr. Esther Choo’s work transcends the walls of the emergency room. Besides treating patients and conducting research, she also utilizes her 20K-follower Twitter platform to advocate for social equity in the medical field.

How Genes Affect Your Flu Vaccines

How Genes Affect Your Flu Vaccines

A national study has confirmed a genetic link to our bodies’ responses to the flu vaccine. Yale Associate Professor of Medicine Ruth Montgomery explains the significance of this discovery to the future of vaccination.

Lyme and Punishment: How Human Activity May Affect the Spread of Lyme disease

Lyme and Punishment: How Human Activity May Affect the Spread of Lyme disease

Contrary to the popular Plum Island conspiracy, Lyme disease may have origins some 60,000 years in the past.

Fighting Fungi by Capturing Sugars

Fighting Fungi by Capturing Sugars

Scientists from the Yale Chemistry Department have developed a new small molecule that bolsters the body’s own immune system against fungal infections.

Destroying Viruses: A New Protein Could Unlock the Key to Curing Respiratory and Mosquito-Borne Viruses

Destroying Viruses: A New Protein Could Unlock the Key to Curing Respiratory and Mosquito-Borne Viruses

Despite advances in modern medicine, many respiratory and mosquito-borne viruses still have few treatment options. SPCA1, a calcium transporter required in the viral life cycle, may be a potential target to eliminate viruses such as RSV, Zika, and West Nile.

A Graft that Grows With You: How Grafts Become a Part of Your Heart

A Graft that Grows With You: How Grafts Become a Part of Your Heart

Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of disease and death in the U.S, yet patients with faulty arteries are forced to deal with synthetic arterial grafts that degrade slowly, prompting further invasive treatment that costs patients, families, and medical personnel time and money. Ramak Khosravi, MD/PhD candidate at Yale, has come up with a method that she hopes will produce a graft that can seamlessly integrate into human bodies.

Putting a Patch on Resistance: A total synthesis of pleuromutilin opens the door to new long-lasting antibiotics

Putting a Patch on Resistance: A total synthesis of pleuromutilin opens the door to new long-lasting antibiotics

Researchers in the Herzon lab at Yale have devised a total synthesis of the antibiotic pleuromutilin, opening the door to new potential antibiotics to help fight bacterial resistance.

A Reason to Make Cancer Cells Nervous

A Reason to Make Cancer Cells Nervous

An altered form of CRISPR has allowed a Yale-led team of scientists to identify not just the genes linked to the deadly brain cancer glioblastoma, but the actual, specific combinations of genes that directly cause the cancer. They believe their approach can be applied to other cancers, thus enhancing the specificity and effectiveness of our treatments.