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Tag "Mind and Brain"

Hot Wings: Drosophila wings that double as a taste organ and sexual circuitry

Hot Wings: Drosophila wings that double as a taste organ and sexual circuitry

There are only three kinds of organisms known to have wings that are functional for flights—birds, insects, and bats. Even today, wings are often thought of as nothing more than appendages allowing organisms to fly. However, in Drosophila melanogaster (fruit

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Changing A Memory: How Retroactive Interference Can Alter Memories

Changing A Memory: How Retroactive Interference Can Alter Memories

We typically give little thought to the objects we interact with daily, whether that be setting down a water bottle, putting on shoes, or grabbing a backpack. There are two contexts that surrounds these objects: mental and physical. The physical

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Yale Study Investigates Biomarker that may Reveal PTSD Sufferers at Risk of Suicide

Yale Study Investigates Biomarker that may Reveal PTSD Sufferers at Risk of Suicide

More Americans are killing themselves every year than any time since the Second World War, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Health Statistics. The rise in suicide rates is especially high among veterans suffering from post-traumatic

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A New Window into the Brain

A New Window into the Brain

If you have ever had an MRI or PET scan, you may have wondered how doctors interpret those images of your brain. For decades, they have used what is known as the Standard Cognitive Model (SCM) to study processes that

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What’s That Smell?  Analyzing How Different Smells are Detected

What’s That Smell? Analyzing How Different Smells are Detected

Evolutionarily speaking, smell was the first sense to develop, and yet we still know so little about it. We measure light intensity in watts and sound in decibels, but measuring smell is more arduous because odor environments are exceedingly complex

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Synthesizing Opioid Antagonists: A more sustainable method for creating a lifesaving drug

Synthesizing Opioid Antagonists: A more sustainable method for creating a lifesaving drug

With an increasing intensity in the nation’s opioid epidemic, the public health community has been searching for ways to manage drug addiction. Chemical antagonists have proven effective in binding to opioid receptors, thus competing with opioid agonists and blocking them

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Can’t Sleep? Neither do Flies

Can’t Sleep? Neither do Flies

Ask ten students how much they sleep and you’ll end up with ten different answers. Although it’s generally accepted that eight hours a night is a good goal, scientists are unsure how much sleep is necessary for survival. Sleep is

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The Promise of GABA: New therapeutic molecules found to treat cognitive decline and depression

The Promise of GABA: New therapeutic molecules found to treat cognitive decline and depression

Drugs that treat diseases of the brain are notoriously difficult to create. The first bar­rier to the development of these drugs is physical—the blood-brain barrier (BBB) acts as a bouncer for the brain, filtering all blood flowing in. The second

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A New Reality: VR technology treats phobias in autistic patients

A New Reality: VR technology treats phobias in autistic patients

Most people know someone with autism, whether it be a sibling, a close friend, or an acquaintance. The Center for Disease Control’s 2014 census found that one in fifty-nine children living in the US has autism—more than double the number

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Accelerating MRI: A novel sampling method to shorten MRI scan time

Accelerating MRI: A novel sampling method to shorten MRI scan time

Imagine yourself mowing a lawn. If it was a leisurely Sunday morning, you might go back and forth in neat rows to ensure that every blade of grass was evenly cut. But what if you were in a rush? You

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