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Tag "Mind and Brain"

fMRI: Uncertain Uncertainties

fMRI: Uncertain Uncertainties

MIT graduate student Ed Vul recently stirred up the field of neuroscience with a paper claiming that the technique of “non-independent analysis” inflates correlations between cognitive performance measure and brain activity as measures by fMRI.

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Book Review: “Mania: a Short History of Bipolar Disorder”

Book Review: “Mania: a Short History of Bipolar Disorder”

In a definitional whirlwind, David Healy in Mania upsets any notions of the conti­nuity of our time’s mental disorders, following the history of bipolar disorder from the ancient Greeks through the present.

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Everyday Q&A: What causes the red wine headache?

Everyday Q&A: What causes the red wine headache?

People have probably been complaining about the notorious Red Wine Headache (RWH) ever since red wine first emerged in 6000 BC in western Asia. As of yet, however, researchers have not been able to pinpoint a single etiology.

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Ears Can’t Take All the Credit: Facial Expressions Influence Hearing

Ears Can’t Take All the Credit: Facial Expressions Influence Hearing

In a recently published paper in The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Takayuki Ito and colleagues at the Haskins Laboratory tested whether stretching a subject’s skin in a certain direction while streaming a set of words in the subject’s ear affected what was actually heard.

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Hold That Thought: Professor Receives Award to Study Intelligence

Hold That Thought: Professor Receives Award to Study Intelligence

Jeremy Gray, Assistant Professor of Psychol­ogy, is one of these researchers. Gray received the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE) to further his research on the link among emotion, self-control, and intelligence.

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Memory and Emotion: What Rats can Teach Us

Memory and Emotion: What Rats can Teach Us

The neurobiological substrates of memory and emotion have eluded neuroscientists for decades, but Yale’s researchers are shedding light on the mechanisms by which our brains remember by exploring emotional memory processing in rats.

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Everyday Q&A: How do SSRIs work?

The most popular type of antidepressant today is the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), such as Prozac, Zoloft, or Lexapro, introduced in 1987.

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Everyday Q&A: How does aging affect memory?

In general, older people have more difficulty learning new things, retrieving old information, and multitasking. In order to understand what causes this weakening, we must first understand how memory works.

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Natural Birth May Lead to Better Baby Bonding

Natural Birth May Lead to Better Baby Bonding

Yale Child Study Center Assistant Professor James Swain, M.D. recently published an article in the Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry examining the relationship between a mother’s bond to her baby and the method of delivery at birth.

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Karyn Frick Awarded Medtronic Prize for Women’s Health Research

Yale associate professor of psychology Karyn Frick was awarded the third annual Society for Women’s Health Research Medtronic Prize for Scientific Contributions to Women’s Health.

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