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Tag "Molecular Biology"

Retracing Millions of Steps: Investigating the transcriptional dynamics of mouse organogenesis

Retracing Millions of Steps: Investigating the transcriptional dynamics of mouse organogenesis

It is not too difficult to see how an organism develops on a macro scale. Depending on the subject, it can be as simple as placing an embryo in a petri dish and peering at it through a microscope every

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Watching Actin in Action: Unveiling new discoveries about our cytoskeleton

Watching Actin in Action: Unveiling new discoveries about our cytoskeleton

Just like complex vertebrates, cells are sup­ported by their own kind of skeleton. In fact, the cell’s skeleton, called the cytoskeleton, is very dynamic—the constituent “bones” can assemble and disassemble as required. One key player in the cytoskeleton is the

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Blaming Bacteria: The biggest contributor to human drug metabolism isn’t human

Blaming Bacteria: The biggest contributor to human drug metabolism isn’t human

You share 99.9 percent of your genetic material with the person sitting next to you. This genetic material, or DNA, encodes the proteins your body produces and, by extension, all of your traits. However, despite your genetic similarity, your neighbor

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An Unlikely Partnership: Why a parasitic relationship became mutualistic

An Unlikely Partnership: Why a parasitic relationship became mutualistic

When we think about bacteriophages, we don’t typically think of cooperation. Commonly represented with six legs and a big “head”, bacteriophages can look more like a bug than a microbial predator. Bacteriophages, a type of virus, attack by injecting their

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A False Fixation on Nitrogen: How nitrogen-fixing trees may slow forest regrowth

A False Fixation on Nitrogen: How nitrogen-fixing trees may slow forest regrowth

Understanding forest regrowth is crucial to predicting and mitigating environmental damage, and with over half of the word’s tropical forests currently recovering from human land use, insight into forest regrowth mechanisms is more important than ever. To accurately model and

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Sugar’s Saving Graces: Reducing the strain of an active lifestyle

Sugar’s Saving Graces: Reducing the strain of an active lifestyle

Researchers studying hawk moths discover the solution to a long-standing paradox in our understanding of metabolism. An ancient biological remnant of a different time may be responsible for protecting us against the more dangerous side-effects of the oxygen we need to survive.

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Cracking The Code of mRNA Regulation

Cracking The Code of mRNA Regulation

Yale researchers have developed a technique to decode a heretofore-undeciphered language – that which governs the survival and destruction of our transcriptomes.

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Finding NoBody, Your Cell’s Secret Housekeeping Protein

Finding NoBody, Your Cell’s Secret Housekeeping Protein

This recently discovered microprotein has the ability to remove excess genetic material in cells. Researchers are only beginning to explore its potential.

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The Hunt Is On: Mapping brain patterns during predatory hunting

The Hunt Is On: Mapping brain patterns during predatory hunting

Using a technique called optogenetics, researchers at Yale have identified the region of the brain critical for predatory hunting. At the switch of a button, the researchers manipulated when the docile mice transformed into voracious hunters.

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Micro-microbial Economics: Competition at play in microbial populations

Micro-microbial Economics: Competition at play in microbial populations

Microbial populations may have to contend with a macro menace: freeloaders. Yale researchers are probing the economics of bacterial and fungal microbes.

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