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Tag "Physics and Space"

In the Seas of Titan

In the Seas of Titan

An Extraterrestrial Submarine On a moon of Saturn called Titan, a dragonfly hovers over the equator, while a turtle ripples the surface of Kraken Mare, a sea of liquid methane. Surviving in temperatures below -300 °F, these aren’t hardy new

Tracking Transition: From dinosaurs to birds, brain-skull evolution

Tracking Transition: From dinosaurs to birds, brain-skull evolution

New discovery in skull and brain development has implications for greater understanding of evolution of reptiles and birds.

Guide to the Galaxy: A SAGA: Neighboring galaxies provide clues to the nature of the universe

Guide to the Galaxy: A SAGA: Neighboring galaxies provide clues to the nature of the universe

The Milky Way Galaxy has long been studied as a model for other galaxies in the universe. However, Yale professor Marla Geha is part of a collaboration exploring just how different the Milky Way might actually be.

Making the most of twists and turns: Harvesting mechanical energy with carbon nanotube yarns

Making the most of twists and turns: Harvesting mechanical energy with carbon nanotube yarns

American and South Korean scientists have developed carbon nanotube yarns that convert twisting and stretching motions into electrical signals. The applications range from wearable sensors to harnessing the energy of ocean waves.

Brilliant Bacteria: Programming Bacteria to Make Materials

Brilliant Bacteria: Programming Bacteria to Make Materials

Researchers at Duke have used synthetic biology techniques to engineer bacteria to produce a protein capable of constructing an electronic pressure sensor when supplemented with gold nanoparticles. With a variety of future applications, this technology will diversify how we use microorganisms in biophysical systems.

Mars Mirrors Early Earth: Hydrothermal seafloor deposits on Mars send us back in time

Mars Mirrors Early Earth: Hydrothermal seafloor deposits on Mars send us back in time

Researchers recently discovered evidence of ancient hydrothermal deposits in the Eridania Basin on Mars. These may hold insight into the conditions surrounding the origin of life on Earth.

A False Fixation on Nitrogen: How nitrogen-fixing trees may slow forest regrowth

A False Fixation on Nitrogen: How nitrogen-fixing trees may slow forest regrowth

Understanding forest regrowth is crucial to predicting and mitigating environmental damage, and with over half of the word’s tropical forests currently recovering from human land use, insight into forest regrowth mechanisms is more important than ever. To accurately model and

The Sound of Qubits: How Acoustics and Qubits Will Contribute to the Next Computing Revolution

The Sound of Qubits: How Acoustics and Qubits Will Contribute to the Next Computing Revolution

Quantum computing is harnessing the power of quantum mechanics to achieve computational feats once thought impossible. In the Schoelkopf Lab at the Yale Quantum Institute, the effort to experimentally design a quantum computer is moving quickly, and a recent finding shows promise in coupling qubits to sound waves.

What’s Hot, Dense, and Spins Like Crazy?

What’s Hot, Dense, and Spins Like Crazy?

Just moments after the big bang, all matter existed in a state called the quark-gluon plasma. Yale professor Helen Caines and her group work with the STAR collaboration, together aiming to discover the properties of our universe this early in its history.

Starry Fuel Tanks: What fuels the starburst phases of galaxies?

Starry Fuel Tanks: What fuels the starburst phases of galaxies?

A long time ago, in galaxies far, far away, stars were churned out at unprecedented rates: over 100 solar masses were produced annually. These luminous, dusty starburst galaxies were 1000 times more common in the very early universe than they