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Tag "Physics and Space"

Brilliant Bacteria: Programming Bacteria to Make Materials

Brilliant Bacteria: Programming Bacteria to Make Materials

Researchers at Duke have used synthetic biology techniques to engineer bacteria to produce a protein capable of constructing an electronic pressure sensor when supplemented with gold nanoparticles. With a variety of future applications, this technology will diversify how we use microorganisms in biophysical systems.

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Mars Mirrors Early Earth: Hydrothermal seafloor deposits on Mars send us back in time

Mars Mirrors Early Earth: Hydrothermal seafloor deposits on Mars send us back in time

Researchers recently discovered evidence of ancient hydrothermal deposits in the Eridania Basin on Mars. These may hold insight into the conditions surrounding the origin of life on Earth.

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A False Fixation on Nitrogen: How nitrogen-fixing trees may slow forest regrowth

A False Fixation on Nitrogen: How nitrogen-fixing trees may slow forest regrowth

Understanding forest regrowth is crucial to predicting and mitigating environmental damage, and with over half of the word’s tropical forests currently recovering from human land use, insight into forest regrowth mechanisms is more important than ever. To accurately model and

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The Sound of Qubits: How Acoustics and Qubits Will Contribute to the Next Computing Revolution

The Sound of Qubits: How Acoustics and Qubits Will Contribute to the Next Computing Revolution

Quantum computing is harnessing the power of quantum mechanics to achieve computational feats once thought impossible. In the Schoelkopf Lab at the Yale Quantum Institute, the effort to experimentally design a quantum computer is moving quickly, and a recent finding shows promise in coupling qubits to sound waves.

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What’s Hot, Dense, and Spins Like Crazy?

What’s Hot, Dense, and Spins Like Crazy?

Just moments after the big bang, all matter existed in a state called the quark-gluon plasma. Yale professor Helen Caines and her group work with the STAR collaboration, together aiming to discover the properties of our universe this early in its history.

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Starry Fuel Tanks: What fuels the starburst phases of galaxies?

Starry Fuel Tanks: What fuels the starburst phases of galaxies?

A long time ago, in galaxies far, far away, stars were churned out at unprecedented rates: over 100 solar masses were produced annually. These luminous, dusty starburst galaxies were 1000 times more common in the very early universe than they

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Good PROSPECTs for Neutrino Physics: Yale Leads New Experiment For Weird Neutrino Behavior

Good PROSPECTs for Neutrino Physics: Yale Leads New Experiment For Weird Neutrino Behavior

In the time it takes you to read this sentence, more than 100 billion neutrinos from the sun will pass through your fingertip. You’re not likely to notice—the neutrino is a tiny, subatomic particle with virtually no mass. It interacts

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Arctic Ocean Craters: Sudden Methane Release Linked to Ice Sheet Retreat

Arctic Ocean Craters: Sudden Methane Release Linked to Ice Sheet Retreat

Researchers have linked massive pits in the Arctic seafloor to the global thawing that occurred the end of the last glacial period: a discovery that may have potential implications for modern climate change.

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Hubble’s Successor: Continuing the Exploration of the Cosmos

Hubble’s Successor: Continuing the Exploration of the Cosmos

Since the dawn of humankind, our sights have always been drawn towards the stars, and as technological innovation continues to bolster our curiosity, our knowledge of the cosmos reaches new heights. NASA is looking to supply a new toolset for

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When Noise Becomes a Signal:  A Study of Random Motion

When Noise Becomes a Signal: A Study of Random Motion

The world is filled with chaos: the coffee you drink is a mixture of scattered particles swirling in random motion, ships are thrown to-and-fro by sudden bad weather, and wind blows your bike off course. A recent study demonstrates how this chaos can be reduced into a simple graph that can illustrate when, and how, chaos will strike.

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