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Tag "Science and Society"

Undergraduate Profile Katie Melbourne (SY ’19): From Yale to NASA

Undergraduate Profile Katie Melbourne (SY ’19): From Yale to NASA

Early in the morning, she trains for marathons to raise funds for Camp Kesem, a summer camp that supports children whose parents have cancer. Then she goes to work at the NASA headquarters in Washington, D.C., drafting international space agreements

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Watching Your Health with Wearables: Detecting Illnesses with Smartwatches

Watching Your Health with Wearables: Detecting Illnesses with Smartwatches

The Snyder Lab at Stanford is working on an algorithm that uses medical data from wearable biosensors like smartwatches to detect when people get sick. Their research could completely change the way we diagnose and treat diseases.

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Fighting Battery Fires with Microfibers

Fighting Battery Fires with Microfibers

As a possible solution to exploding batteries, the Yicui lab at Stanford has developed a new microfiber safety mechanism contained inside the battery.

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Growing a Lung in Culture: New bioreactor system allows crucial oxygen exchange.

Growing a Lung in Culture: New bioreactor system allows crucial oxygen exchange.

A new whole-lung bioreactor system involving the maintenance and delivery of oxygen to the lungs was developed by Yale Professor of Biomedical Engineering Laura Niklason. This system looks to optimize the processes of growing lungs in bioreactors and enables the real-time monitoring of oxygen intake and cell proliferation in the lung.

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What Woodpeckers Can Teach Us

What Woodpeckers Can Teach Us

A computer program, designed to teach users to differentiate between kinds of woodpeckers, attracted the attention of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency for its power to improve teaching technology. Assistant Professor Amin Karbasi has been awarded for his promising research.

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Unlikely Friendships: Gut Bacteria Edition

Unlikely Friendships: Gut Bacteria Edition

Researchers study the guts of insects to uncover how a symbiotic microbe develops a part of the tsetse fly’s immune system. This finding raises the importance of understanding the role of bacterial species in the human microbiome.

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Mega Cities, Mega Problems

Mega Cities, Mega Problems

A new publication examines how population growth and urbanization will reduce croplands, potentially destabilize governments and instigate social conflict. Yale Professor Karen Seto, a coauthor of the international study, studies urbanization and the changing global landscape.

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Treating Autism Case by Case: Innovative personalized treatment methods for Autism Spectrum Disorders

Treating Autism Case by Case: Innovative personalized treatment methods for Autism Spectrum Disorders

Following developments elsewhere in the field of treatment, like the increasingly specific cancer medications and therapies that target specific cells unique to each type of cancer, researchers at the Child Study Center are finding ways to personalize autism medicine. In the future, treatment could be tailored to fit the needs of each individual patient.

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Brain Drain Before Birth: Neural health problems of preterm babies appear to start before birth

Brain Drain Before Birth: Neural health problems of preterm babies appear to start before birth

Detroit has a high rate of preterm births, and these babies tend to experience neurodevelopmental delays. Based on a new study, those delays may start in the womb.

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Cooperating to Understand Cooperation

Cooperating to Understand Cooperation

The question of whether humans are inherently selfish or selfless has long been a struggle to answer. Yale Ph.D. candidate Adam Bear and Professor David Rand strive to explain human behavior of cooperation and selfishness with a theoretical game theory model.

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