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Tag "Science and Society"

The Clock Keeps Ticking: How the circadian clock helps regulate gene expression

The Clock Keeps Ticking: How the circadian clock helps regulate gene expression

Normal physiological function requires the periodic expression of genes corresponding roughly to a 24 hour cycle. Researchers from the University of California have investigated the molecular nature of the circadian clock responsible for coordinating activity levels of genes to the day-night cycle.

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Predicting Suicide: Using Brain Imaging Techniques to Identify At-Risk Individuals

Predicting Suicide: Using Brain Imaging Techniques to Identify At-Risk Individuals

Yale study finds new way to identify individuals at risk of attempting suicide using brain-imaging techniques.

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Yale Graduate Challenges Existing Ideas About Ecosystem Models

Yale Graduate Challenges Existing Ideas About Ecosystem Models

Plant functional traits are viewed as key to predicting important ecosystem and community properties among biogeographic regions. However, a recent study led by Elisabeth Forrestel GRD ’15 challenges the trait-based approach to predicting ecosystem function by demonstrating that different combinations of functional traits can act to maximize net primary productivity, a community property, in a given environmental setting.

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Undergraduate Profile Katie Melbourne (SY ’19): From Yale to NASA

Undergraduate Profile Katie Melbourne (SY ’19): From Yale to NASA

Early in the morning, she trains for marathons to raise funds for Camp Kesem, a summer camp that supports children whose parents have cancer. Then she goes to work at the NASA headquarters in Washington, D.C., drafting international space agreements

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Watching Your Health with Wearables: Detecting Illnesses with Smartwatches

Watching Your Health with Wearables: Detecting Illnesses with Smartwatches

The Snyder Lab at Stanford is working on an algorithm that uses medical data from wearable biosensors like smartwatches to detect when people get sick. Their research could completely change the way we diagnose and treat diseases.

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Fighting Battery Fires with Microfibers

Fighting Battery Fires with Microfibers

As a possible solution to exploding batteries, the Yicui lab at Stanford has developed a new microfiber safety mechanism contained inside the battery.

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Growing a Lung in Culture: New bioreactor system allows crucial oxygen exchange.

Growing a Lung in Culture: New bioreactor system allows crucial oxygen exchange.

A new whole-lung bioreactor system involving the maintenance and delivery of oxygen to the lungs was developed by Yale Professor of Biomedical Engineering Laura Niklason. This system looks to optimize the processes of growing lungs in bioreactors and enables the real-time monitoring of oxygen intake and cell proliferation in the lung.

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What Woodpeckers Can Teach Us

What Woodpeckers Can Teach Us

A computer program, designed to teach users to differentiate between kinds of woodpeckers, attracted the attention of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency for its power to improve teaching technology. Assistant Professor Amin Karbasi has been awarded for his promising research.

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Unlikely Friendships: Gut Bacteria Edition

Unlikely Friendships: Gut Bacteria Edition

Researchers study the guts of insects to uncover how a symbiotic microbe develops a part of the tsetse fly’s immune system. This finding raises the importance of understanding the role of bacterial species in the human microbiome.

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Mega Cities, Mega Problems

Mega Cities, Mega Problems

A new publication examines how population growth and urbanization will reduce croplands, potentially destabilize governments and instigate social conflict. Yale Professor Karen Seto, a coauthor of the international study, studies urbanization and the changing global landscape.

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