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Engineering and Computing

Printing Power Generators

Printing Power Generators

Researchers at the University of Toronto have designed a technology that could make solar cells more effective and cheaper to produce.

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Brain on a Chip

Brain on a Chip

How can you build a better chip? One place to start is the human brain; with its trillions of synaptic connections, the brain is a perfect model for a complicated circuit. A Yale researcher has designed a chip called TrueNorth that takes inspiration from the human brain.

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Bat Bot Takes Flight

Bat Bot Takes Flight

The flight patterns and agility of bats have long fascinated scientists. Now, a team of researchers have created a fully self-contained, autonomous flying robot that weighs 93 grams, called Bat Bot (B2), that mimics the morphological properties of bat wings and has important implications for animal flight analysis.

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Watching Your Health with Wearables: Detecting Illnesses with Smartwatches

Watching Your Health with Wearables: Detecting Illnesses with Smartwatches

The Snyder Lab at Stanford is working on an algorithm that uses medical data from wearable biosensors like smartwatches to detect when people get sick. Their research could completely change the way we diagnose and treat diseases.

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Unraveling the Chemistry of the Tightest Knot Yet

Unraveling the Chemistry of the Tightest Knot Yet

Knots have proven useful since the dawn of mankind. Drawing on this as inspiration, Professor David A. Leigh, along with his team at the University of Manchester’s School of Chemistry, synthesized the most complex chemical knot yet, and believe that it holds many promising applications.

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Fighting Battery Fires with Microfibers

Fighting Battery Fires with Microfibers

As a possible solution to exploding batteries, the Yicui lab at Stanford has developed a new microfiber safety mechanism contained inside the battery.

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Cooperating to Understand Cooperation

Cooperating to Understand Cooperation

The question of whether humans are inherently selfish or selfless has long been a struggle to answer. Yale Ph.D. candidate Adam Bear and Professor David Rand strive to explain human behavior of cooperation and selfishness with a theoretical game theory model.

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Organic Solar Cells Reach New Heights in Efficiency

Organic Solar Cells Reach New Heights in Efficiency

The old “solar cell” revolution has come to a halt. The types of solar cells that are now widespread were commercialized more than fifty years ago. Despite scientific improvements and increased attention to solar energy, the cost of conventional solar

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Expanding the Quantum Computing Toolbox

Expanding the Quantum Computing Toolbox

Have you ever wondered about the possibilities of uniting quantum mechanics and computer science? Yale researchers have made important progress towards the construction of more powerful quantum computers.

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Sticking It to Cancer: Fighting Tumors with Nanoparticles

Sticking It to Cancer: Fighting Tumors with Nanoparticles

Nanoparticles offer an alternative treatment for administering drugs to cancer patients with ovarian and uterine carcinomas. Yale researchers have demonstrated the efficacy of drug delivery via a bioadhesive class of these nanoparticles.

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