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Posts From Mindy Le

How to Starve a Parasite: Exploring the relationship between host metabolism and infectious disease

How to Starve a Parasite: Exploring the relationship between host metabolism and infectious disease

When you are sick, do you ever lose your appetite? Your favorite meal suddenly seems less exciting, and you can’t taste the difference between cookies and cardboard. It turns out, there may be an evolutionary reason for this. Researchers at

Demystifying Consciousness

Demystifying Consciousness

Understanding electrical circuits in the brain When we wake up, our brains shift from being unconscious to conscious. While we usually think of this transition as the prime example of the emergence of “consciousness,” consciousness is also defined as any

Drop the Broom: Inhibiting a Housekeeping Enzyme to Treat Diseases

Drop the Broom: Inhibiting a Housekeeping Enzyme to Treat Diseases

Delivering therapeutic treatments to cancer, diabetes, and neurodegenerative targets Within our bodies’ cells, a myriad of chemical reactions orchestrate life. These reactions ensure our health and are essential to all of our bodily functions, including metabolism and homeostasis within the

Science in the Spotlight: How to Tame a Fox (And Build a Dog)

Science in the Spotlight: How to Tame a Fox (And Build a Dog)

They greet their owners at the door with leaps and wagging tails, begging for pats. Read Lee Dugatkin and Lyudmila Trut’s account of how they tamed the fox and why it matters.

Brilliant Bacteria: Programming Bacteria to Make Materials

Brilliant Bacteria: Programming Bacteria to Make Materials

Researchers at Duke have used synthetic biology techniques to engineer bacteria to produce a protein capable of constructing an electronic pressure sensor when supplemented with gold nanoparticles. With a variety of future applications, this technology will diversify how we use microorganisms in biophysical systems.

Decoding the Largest Mammalian Genome

Decoding the Largest Mammalian Genome

Think that you have a large genome? Think again. The red vizcacha rat from Argentina is known to have a genome size almost three times larger than that of humans, and researchers have unearthed new data about this intriguing phenomenon.