From the Editor: Issue 89.1 “Battling OCD in Real Time”

From the Editor: Issue 89.1 “Battling OCD in Real Time”

🕔08:52, 22.Feb 2016

Science can be intimidating. It is fast-paced and unyielding. We are only human. It’s natural to feel vulnerable to science when it takes the form of a massive hurricane or appears as a microscopic virus hiding in your cells, plotting

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Foresting from the Ground Up: Connecticut landowners find their niche in forestry

Foresting from the Ground Up: Connecticut landowners find their niche in forestry

🕔08:51, 22.Feb 2016

Almost 60 percent of Connecticut is covered in woodland, largely owned by individual landowners. Guy Estell, a resident of Connecticut’s so-called “Quiet Corner,” reflects on past, present, and future engagement with issues of forest management and environmental sustainability.

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Battling OCD in Real-Time: Live brain imaging helps patients attack anxiety at the source

Battling OCD in Real-Time: Live brain imaging helps patients attack anxiety at the source

🕔19:56, 20.Feb 2016

In a recent Yale study, researchers have shown that it may be possible to teach sufferers of OCD to control their anxiety by giving them immediate feedback on their brain’s activity. This method may also prove useful in better understanding the underlying neural substrates that may define the disease.

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The Bugs and the Bees: How viruses bridged the gap between bees and butterflies

The Bugs and the Bees: How viruses bridged the gap between bees and butterflies

🕔12:43, 5.Feb 2016

What eats leaves, transforms into a butterfly, and contains wasp genes in its genome? Discover exactly how the caterpillar became a natural GMO and why modern technology is changing the face of evolutionary research.

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Halting Hemorrhage: Self-propelled microparticles offer new solution for extreme bleeding

Halting Hemorrhage: Self-propelled microparticles offer new solution for extreme bleeding

🕔12:29, 5.Feb 2016

Recently, researchers at the University of British Columbia designed a new method for stopping hemorrhaging. The system relies on microparticles that propel themselves upstream through blood, delivering coagulants to hard-to-reach wounds.

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Former Yale Radiobiologist Co-awarded Nobel Prize in Chemistry

Former Yale Radiobiologist Co-awarded Nobel Prize in Chemistry

🕔23:50, 4.Feb 2016

Forty years after transitioning from medical practice to biochemistry research, Aziz Sancar has received the highest honor in his field: the 2015 Nobel Prize in chemistry. Sancar shared this award with Tomas Lindahl and Paul Modrich for their wide-ranging “mechanistic

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Beautiful, Simple, Exact, Crazy: New textbook explores diverse, real world applications of math

Beautiful, Simple, Exact, Crazy: New textbook explores diverse, real world applications of math

🕔23:36, 4.Feb 2016

Mathematics lies behind the circuitry of every computer, the operation of every business, and even the composition of every hit song. But millions of students struggle with math every day, and many will never grasp the intricacies of algebra and

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Leptospirosis: An Unexpected Source of Global Disease Burden

Leptospirosis: An Unexpected Source of Global Disease Burden

🕔00:13, 4.Feb 2016

According to the research of Albert Ko at the Yale School of Medicine, leptospirosis makes a surprisingly high and previously unmeasured contribution to the global burden of disease. Ko’s team found that the tropical disease results in more than 60,000

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The Significance of Swine: Pigs in societal evolution

The Significance of Swine: Pigs in societal evolution

🕔23:56, 3.Feb 2016

Mark Essig lights up when he tells the unlikely story of how 19th century hog drives in the Blue Ridge Mountains created a complex infrastructure of taverns, roads, and pig statues across North Carolina. This story fascinated Essig and led

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Last Barrier to a Cure HIV: Researchers Examine Reactivation of Hidden Viruses

Last Barrier to a Cure HIV: Researchers Examine Reactivation of Hidden Viruses

🕔23:40, 3.Feb 2016

Thirty years after the discovery of the HIV virus, researchers are still unable to find a cure for the disease. Kathryn Miller-Jensen at the Yale School of Engineering and Applied Science discusses the ability of latent HIV to reactivate, which is one of the properties of the virus that make it so difficult to treat.

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