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83.4 Full Lengths

From the Editor: 83.4 The Ubiquity of Science

The Ubiquity of Science “Scientific thought is the common heritage of mankind.”- Abdus Salam I have been pursuing science since my chemistry class sophomore year of high school. Whether in the classroom, at the lab, during conversation with friends, or

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Dark Energy: Studying the Expansion and Fate of the Universe

In spite of gravity’s attractive force, the universe expands at an accelerating rate.
Yale Professor of Cosmology, Dr. Priyamvada Natarajan, studies dark energy, the
fluid responsible for the negative pressure in the universe.

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Fourier Transform: Nature’s Way of Analyzing Data

In his biophysics research, Yale Professor Peter Moore uses the same mathematical
method that a lens uses to project images on the retina and that an MP3 player uses
to compress audio files. The mathematical method is called the Fourier transform.

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Using Poisonous Spider Toxins as Pain Medication

With over forty different species and hundreds of toxins in their venom, funnel spiders can cause serious medical injury or death to victims who are not treated with the effective antivenom. Would you want these spiders’ toxins anywhere near your skin? Learn more about how Professor Nitabach and Dr. Gui have studied genetic sequences of such spider toxins and their possible applications as pain medication!

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Marriage of Eastern and Western Approaches to the Treatment of Cancer

Eye of newt and toe of frog? Maybe! YSM gets an inside look at Yale researchers taking holistic approaches to the treatment of cancer and mixing the new with the old.

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Recognizing the Self: Mechanisms of Schizophrenia

What if you heard voices when there was no one there? What if the reality around you slowly disintegrated? According to collaborative research between Judith M. Ford and Daniel H. Mathalon, Adjunct Professors of Psychiatry, dysfunction of a critical brain

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Art Restoration: The Fine Line Between Art and Science

Matthew Chalkley examines the surprisingly and ever-increasingly scientific endeavor of art conservation and restoration. From isotope dating to Raman spectroscopy, art conservators are developing safer and less invasive techniques to restore art to their fullest glory.

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Congo Red Dot Test: A Groundbreaking Method to Diagnose Preeclampsia

Preeclampsia is a disorder of the blood vessels that affects 5-8% of pregnant women but can be deadly and is often detected when it is too late. Researchers have stumbled upon interesting properties of this disease that enabled them to discover the Congo Red Dot Test, a cheap and easy way to diagnose this disorder at its early stages.

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