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Cryo-Electron Microscopy Made Easier on the Pocketbook

Yale researchers have unveiled a new cryo-electron microscope, able to probe within the structure of proteins.

Brilliant Bacteria: Programming Bacteria to Make Materials

Researchers at Duke have used synthetic biology techniques to engineer bacteria to produce a protein capable of constructing an electronic pressure sensor when supplemented with gold nanoparticles. With a variety of future applications, this technology will diversify how we use microorganisms in biophysical systems.

Q&A: Can Evaporation Drive Energy Production?

Scientists are looking into using the evaporation of lakes as a new energy resource.

Professor Spotlight: Professor Jim Mayer wins 2018 ACS Award in Inorganic Chemistry

Professor Jim Mayer was recently named one of the winners of the 2018 ACS Award in Inorganic Chemistry and has published multiple papers in 2017. His lab focuses on synthesis of new molecules, analysis of their structure and properties, and study of their chemical reactivity.

Demystifying the Genes Behind Breast Cancer

It’s taken over two decades to fit together pieces of information about the BRCA genes behind breast and ovarian cancer. Researchers in the Sung Lab at Yale University, led by Patrick Sung and Weixing Zhao, have tackled the problem by developing a way to study proteins, which led to discovering the function of BRCA1 and its interaction with other genes in the role of tumor expression.

Studying the Few to Serve the Many: Studying the rare Gaucher disease to discover molecular mechanisms behind the common Parkinson’s Disease

Yale scientists found two potential enzymes to target via cell therapy to treat the common variety of Parkinson’s disease associated with Gaucher disease. These two enzymes regulate the pathology of the specific lipids that accumulate due to Gaucher disease.

A New Map of the Body: Profiling Gene Expression Levels across Human Tissues

The Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) project aims to characterize the gene expression profiles of different human tissues. The resulting gene expression map could help clarify how genetic variations work at a molecular level to influence gene expression.

Giving Genes PiggyBac Rides

New technology that enables certain segments of DNA to “jump” around the genome via a cut and paste method can serve as a more cost-effective, time-efficient alternative to using STEM cells

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