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Spiny Slugs: New fossil discovery sheds light on mollusk evolution

Discovery of a slug-like organism called Calvipilosa, literally meaning “hairy scalp”, leads to new knowledge of what the earliest common ancestor of mollusks would have looked like.

If It’s Broke, Don’t Fix It: Curing Brain Cancer by Preventing DNA Repair

Broken DNA can put us on the path towards fixing cancer. Research by Peter Glazer and Ranjit Bindra of the Yale Cancer Center suggests that carcinogenic mutations most current therapies aim to repair can instead serve as selecting agents for better drug targeting with DNA repair inhibitors.

Lo and Behold: Reveries of a Connected World

What does it mean to live in a world whose technological capabilities are nearly outstripping our comprehension? The new documentary Lo and Behold seeks to find out.

A “Beta” Way to Treat Type I Diabetes: A Sweet Discovery

Diabetes is caused by the immune system’s attack on its own beta cells. Yale researchers have uncovered a population of beta cells resistant to these immune attacks, providing hope for those with Type I diabetes.

No Cell Left Behind: Mapping the Human Body

Researchers at the Weizmann Institute have drawn a cellular map of the liver, bringing us one step closer to knowing where each of our 37 trillion cells lies in our bodies.

Predicting Suicide: Using Brain Imaging Techniques to Identify At-Risk Individuals

Yale study finds new way to identify individuals at risk of attempting suicide using brain-imaging techniques.

Yale Graduate Challenges Existing Ideas About Ecosystem Models

Plant functional traits are viewed as key to predicting important ecosystem and community properties among biogeographic regions. However, a recent study led by Elisabeth Forrestel GRD ’15 challenges the trait-based approach to predicting ecosystem function by demonstrating that different combinations of functional traits can act to maximize net primary productivity, a community property, in a given environmental setting.

Brain on a Chip

How can you build a better chip? One place to start is the human brain; with its trillions of synaptic connections, the brain is a perfect model for a complicated circuit. A Yale researcher has designed a chip called TrueNorth that takes inspiration from the human brain.

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Earth and Environment

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Matter and Energy

Life from Within? Organic Materials Stemming from Ceres’ Interior

Life from Within? Organic Materials Stemming from Ceres’ Interior

For hundreds of years, researchers have thought that organic materials reach planets by traveling on asteroids and comets. New data from the Dawn Spacecraft on the dwarf planet Ceres leads to a surprising result: instead of coming from the outside, organics may sometimes come from within.

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It was wonderful to see all of you at Dr. David Grimm's lecture and College Tea! Thank you to the Poynter Fellowship in Journalism at Yale and Saybrook College for co-sponsoring this event. ... See MoreSee Less

Posted 4 days ago  ·  

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The Yale Scientific Magazine is excited to be announcing a special Poynter Fellowship talk by Dr. David Grimm (GRD '04) on Wednesday, September 20th from 3-4pm in WLH 201 (Sudler Hall). Dr. David Grimm is currently the Online News Editor of Science, and is an award winning writer and author. His talk is titled "Stop Talking Like a Scientist: Communicating Research to the Public", and will be very helpful for undergraduate and graduate students interested in communicating their research to a general audience. We look forwards to seeing you on Wednesday! ... See MoreSee Less

How to Not Talk Like a Scientist with David Grimm (GRD '04)

September 20, 2017, 3:00pm - September 20, 2017, 4:00pm

The Yale Scientific Magazine is excited to be announcing a special Poynter Fellowship talk by Dr. David Grimm (GRD '04) on Wednesday, September 20th from 3-4pm in WLH 201 (Sudler Hall). Dr. David Grimm is currently the Online News Editor of Science, ...

Posted 1 week ago  ·  

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