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The Sound of Qubits: How Acoustics and Qubits Will Contribute to the Next Computing Revolution

Quantum computing is harnessing the power of quantum mechanics to achieve computational feats once thought impossible. In the Schoelkopf Lab at the Yale Quantum Institute, the effort to experimentally design a quantum computer is moving quickly, and a recent finding shows promise in coupling qubits to sound waves.

Not So Tumor Suppressant: How a single gene can both promote and suppress tumor growth

Tet2, a gene believed to be a tumor suppressor since 2009, may also have tumor-promoting effects on other types of cancer, raising some interesting questions about what it means to be a tumor suppressor and how Tet2 could affect different cancer treatments.

Demystifying the Genes Behind Breast Cancer

It’s taken over two decades to fit together pieces of information about the BRCA genes behind breast and ovarian cancer. Researchers in the Sung Lab at Yale University, led by Patrick Sung and Weixing Zhao, have tackled the problem by developing a way to study proteins, which led to discovering the function of BRCA1 and its interaction with other genes in the role of tumor expression.

Destroying Viruses: A New Protein Could Unlock the Key to Curing Respiratory and Mosquito-Borne Viruses

Despite advances in modern medicine, many respiratory and mosquito-borne viruses still have few treatment options. SPCA1, a calcium transporter required in the viral life cycle, may be a potential target to eliminate viruses such as RSV, Zika, and West Nile.

Life 3.0 Review: Being Human in the Age of Artificial Intelligence

A review of Max Tegmark’s new book on maintaining our humanity and planning for a future with artificial intelligence/advanced machine learning.

Yale Startup Hopes to Deploy Pipe-Inspecting Robots

How are robots changing the field of the petroleum refineries? Find out how Yale startup ARIX is making its breaking through in cutting costs and improving safety in the oil and gas industry.

Brilliant Bacteria: Programming Bacteria to Make Materials

Researchers at Duke have used synthetic biology techniques to engineer bacteria to produce a protein capable of constructing an electronic pressure sensor when supplemented with gold nanoparticles. With a variety of future applications, this technology will diversify how we use microorganisms in biophysical systems.

Studying the Few to Serve the Many: Studying the rare Gaucher disease to discover molecular mechanisms behind the common Parkinson’s Disease

Yale scientists found two potential enzymes to target via cell therapy to treat the common variety of Parkinson’s disease associated with Gaucher disease. These two enzymes regulate the pathology of the specific lipids that accumulate due to Gaucher disease.

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