FEATURED ARTICLES

Giving Genes PiggyBac Rides

New technology that enables certain segments of DNA to “jump” around the genome via a cut and paste method can serve as a more cost-effective, time-efficient alternative to using STEM cells

Brilliant Bacteria: Programming Bacteria to Make Materials

Researchers at Duke have used synthetic biology techniques to engineer bacteria to produce a protein capable of constructing an electronic pressure sensor when supplemented with gold nanoparticles. With a variety of future applications, this technology will diversify how we use microorganisms in biophysical systems.

Hermit Crabs: Shift in Mutualism

Hermit crabs are typically associated with occupying molluscan shells. However, a newly discovered species of hermit crab in the Oshima Strait was found inhabiting walking corals; these corals were previously thought to house only sipunculan worms.

Q&A: Can Evaporation Drive Energy Production?

Scientists are looking into using the evaporation of lakes as a new energy resource.

Undergraduate Profile: Alexander Epstein (SY ’18): Peering into the mind of a future leader in science

Yale senior Alex Epstein (SY ’18) discusses how he developed his interest in biology and research, from his childhood experiences at the Museum of Natural History to his research at Yale.

A New Map of the Body: Profiling Gene Expression Levels across Human Tissues

The Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) project aims to characterize the gene expression profiles of different human tissues. The resulting gene expression map could help clarify how genetic variations work at a molecular level to influence gene expression.

When the Weakest Survive: How weak competitors provide resilience to climate change

Survival of the fittest isn’t the end of the story. New research by Yale scientists shows that weak species are able to grow with stronger species, and the presence of weak species may help ecosystems respond to climate change.

A Graft that Grows With You: How Grafts Become a Part of Your Heart

Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of disease and death in the U.S, yet patients with faulty arteries are forced to deal with synthetic arterial grafts that degrade slowly, prompting further invasive treatment that costs patients, families, and medical personnel time and money. Ramak Khosravi, MD/PhD candidate at Yale, has come up with a method that she hopes will produce a graft that can seamlessly integrate into human bodies.

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