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Treating Autism Case by Case: Innovative personalized treatment methods for Autism Spectrum Disorders

Following developments elsewhere in the field of treatment, like the increasingly specific cancer medications and therapies that target specific cells unique to each type of cancer, researchers at the Child Study Center are finding ways to personalize autism medicine. In the future, treatment could be tailored to fit the needs of each individual patient.

Unveiling Venus’ Mysteries with Gravity Waves

The discovery of gravity waves on Venus sheds light on the mysteries of our closest neighbor in the solar system, with surprising implications for both Earth science and astronomy in general.

Undergraduate Profile Katie Melbourne (SY ’19): From Yale to NASA

Early in the morning, she trains for marathons to raise funds for Camp Kesem, a

Skeletons in the Ice Age Closet

How much did the Ice Age’s widespread mammal extinctions actually impact the ecosystem, and what can this tell us about our mass extinctions today? Dr. Matt Davis of the Department of Geology and Geophysics investigates this question.

Finding NoBody, Your Cell’s Secret Housekeeping Protein

This recently discovered microprotein has the ability to remove excess genetic material in cells. Researchers are only beginning to explore its potential.

Undergraduate Profile Maheen Zakaria (ES ’17): Pakistani Philanthropic Prodigy

Born and raised in Pakistan, Maheen Zakaria ES ’17 has loved science for as long

Fighting Battery Fires with Microfibers

As a possible solution to exploding batteries, the Yicui lab at Stanford has developed a new microfiber safety mechanism contained inside the battery.

Cooperating to Understand Cooperation

The question of whether humans are inherently selfish or selfless has long been a struggle to answer. Yale Ph.D. candidate Adam Bear and Professor David Rand strive to explain human behavior of cooperation and selfishness with a theoretical game theory model.

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Earth and Environment

Nature’s GPS:  It’s Not As Batty As You Think!

Nature’s GPS: It’s Not As Batty As You Think!

Researchers at the Weizmann Institute of Science used an Epyptian-fruit-bat model to study the brain’s representation of navigation from Point A to Point B. Their work on how the bat brain handles goal-focused navigation could affect how we will one day treat Alzheimer’s.

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Engineering and Computing

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Come by the PEABODY2 (on Broadway) for SUSHI and learn how to play the ANGKLUNG with Professor Sukmono, an Indonesian and Javanese language teacher here at Yale. The angklung is a traditional Indonesian musical instrument and can be played in groups!

This event is co-sponsored by Yale Scientific and the Peabody Museum of Natural History.
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SUSHI + Angklung Study Break at the Peabody2

May 1, 2017, 7:00pm - May 1, 2017, 8:00pm

Come by the PEABODY2 (on Broadway) for SUSHI and learn how to play the ANGKLUNG with Professor Sukmono, an Indonesian and Javanese language teacher here at Yale. The angklung is a traditional Indonesian musical instrument and can be played in groups!...

Posted 3 weeks ago  ·  

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