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Hermit Crabs: Shift in Mutualism

Hermit crabs are typically associated with occupying molluscan shells. However, a newly discovered species of hermit crab in the Oshima Strait was found inhabiting walking corals; these corals were previously thought to house only sipunculan worms.

Professor Spotlight: Professor Jim Mayer wins 2018 ACS Award in Inorganic Chemistry

Professor Jim Mayer was recently named one of the winners of the 2018 ACS Award in Inorganic Chemistry and has published multiple papers in 2017. His lab focuses on synthesis of new molecules, analysis of their structure and properties, and study of their chemical reactivity.

Cayo Santiago: No Monkeying Around

In the aftermath of Hurricane Maria, researchers are striving to save the unique monkey population near Puerto Rico.

Brilliant Bacteria: Programming Bacteria to Make Materials

Researchers at Duke have used synthetic biology techniques to engineer bacteria to produce a protein capable of constructing an electronic pressure sensor when supplemented with gold nanoparticles. With a variety of future applications, this technology will diversify how we use microorganisms in biophysical systems.

Demystifying the Genes Behind Breast Cancer

It’s taken over two decades to fit together pieces of information about the BRCA genes behind breast and ovarian cancer. Researchers in the Sung Lab at Yale University, led by Patrick Sung and Weixing Zhao, have tackled the problem by developing a way to study proteins, which led to discovering the function of BRCA1 and its interaction with other genes in the role of tumor expression.

Giving Genes PiggyBac Rides

New technology that enables certain segments of DNA to “jump” around the genome via a cut and paste method can serve as a more cost-effective, time-efficient alternative to using STEM cells

Life 3.0 Review: Being Human in the Age of Artificial Intelligence

A review of Max Tegmark’s new book on maintaining our humanity and planning for a future with artificial intelligence/advanced machine learning.

Macrophage Messengers: Specialized immune cells as targets for metabolism in aging

The communication between the nervous, immune, and metabolic systems changes as people age. A team led by Christina Camell and Vishwa Deep Dixit of the Yale School of Medicine discovered a subset of macrophages at this intersection that could open the door for new strategies to keep people healthier longer.

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