FEATURED ARTICLES

A False Fixation on Nitrogen: How nitrogen-fixing trees may slow forest regrowth

Understanding forest regrowth is crucial to predicting and mitigating environmental damage, and with over half

Timing Your Thoughts

A study published in PNAS in August 2017 showed how the mistiming of someone’s thoughts may be linked to a person’s tendency to hold delusional thoughts.

When the Weakest Survive: How weak competitors provide resilience to climate change

Survival of the fittest isn’t the end of the story. New research by Yale scientists shows that weak species are able to grow with stronger species, and the presence of weak species may help ecosystems respond to climate change.

Hermit Crabs: Shift in Mutualism

Hermit crabs are typically associated with occupying molluscan shells. However, a newly discovered species of hermit crab in the Oshima Strait was found inhabiting walking corals; these corals were previously thought to house only sipunculan worms.

Not So Tumor Suppressant: How a single gene can both promote and suppress tumor growth

Tet2, a gene believed to be a tumor suppressor since 2009, may also have tumor-promoting effects on other types of cancer, raising some interesting questions about what it means to be a tumor suppressor and how Tet2 could affect different cancer treatments.

Undergraduate Profile: Alexander Epstein (SY ’18): Peering into the mind of a future leader in science

Yale senior Alex Epstein (SY ’18) discusses how he developed his interest in biology and research, from his childhood experiences at the Museum of Natural History to his research at Yale.

Studying the Few to Serve the Many: Studying the rare Gaucher disease to discover molecular mechanisms behind the common Parkinson’s Disease

Yale scientists found two potential enzymes to target via cell therapy to treat the common variety of Parkinson’s disease associated with Gaucher disease. These two enzymes regulate the pathology of the specific lipids that accumulate due to Gaucher disease.

Mars Mirrors Early Earth: Hydrothermal seafloor deposits on Mars send us back in time

Researchers recently discovered evidence of ancient hydrothermal deposits in the Eridania Basin on Mars. These may hold insight into the conditions surrounding the origin of life on Earth.

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