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Yale Startup Hopes to Deploy Pipe-Inspecting Robots

How are robots changing the field of the petroleum refineries? Find out how Yale startup ARIX is making its breaking through in cutting costs and improving safety in the oil and gas industry.

Lyme and Punishment: How Human Activity May Affect the Spread of Lyme disease

Contrary to the popular Plum Island conspiracy, Lyme disease may have origins some 60,000 years in the past.

Not So Tumor Suppressant: How a single gene can both promote and suppress tumor growth

Tet2, a gene believed to be a tumor suppressor since 2009, may also have tumor-promoting effects on other types of cancer, raising some interesting questions about what it means to be a tumor suppressor and how Tet2 could affect different cancer treatments.

Optimal Leaps in Optimizing Fat Burn: Improving Our Diet and Health Routines With a Coin-Size Sensor

Think your diet and workout routine are burning fat? You might want to check again. Researchers at ETH Zurich and the University Hospital Zurich have developed an affordable, portable and reliable breath sensor to test rates of fat burning during and following exercise.

Macrophage Messengers: Specialized immune cells as targets for metabolism in aging

The communication between the nervous, immune, and metabolic systems changes as people age. A team led by Christina Camell and Vishwa Deep Dixit of the Yale School of Medicine discovered a subset of macrophages at this intersection that could open the door for new strategies to keep people healthier longer.

Neurons that Drive and Quench Thirst: Identifying the neural mechanisms that regulate water consumption

Until now, thirst was known as a primordial drive that was poorly-understood on the neural level. Researchers at Stanford have identified a mechanism through which a small group of neurons motivate thirst-related behavior.

Alumni Profile: Esther Choo (JE ’94, MD ’01)

Dr. Esther Choo’s work transcends the walls of the emergency room. Besides treating patients and conducting research, she also utilizes her 20K-follower Twitter platform to advocate for social equity in the medical field.

Studying the Few to Serve the Many: Studying the rare Gaucher disease to discover molecular mechanisms behind the common Parkinson’s Disease

Yale scientists found two potential enzymes to target via cell therapy to treat the common variety of Parkinson’s disease associated with Gaucher disease. These two enzymes regulate the pathology of the specific lipids that accumulate due to Gaucher disease.

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