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Search Results for Yu Jun Shen

Keeping Dry Underwater: Learning Superhydrophobicity from Plants

Keeping Dry Underwater: Learning Superhydrophobicity from Plants

Art by AnMei Little. Hydrophobic materials have many applications, yet many are easily disrupted by the environment, losing their dryness. To find the key to the next generation of highly water-repellent materials, scientists have turned to Mother Nature for inspiration,

Graphene from Garbage

Graphene from Garbage

Image courtesy of AlexanderAIUS. In 2004, with tape and a lump of graphite, researchers discovered graphene—a two-dimensional hexagonal lattice of carbon atoms with many industrial applications. Graphene-strengthened cement is lighter and stronger than ordinary cement. Graphene-added batteries have longer battery

Science in the Spotlight: Infinite Powers

Science in the Spotlight: Infinite Powers

Image courtesy of Flickr. Have you ever wondered how DreamWorks animators created Shrek? Or how we may measure the speed of light using cheese in a microwave? Calculus holds the key. Whether you are a prospective STEM major or just

An Aerial-Aquatic Vehicle Thanks to Honeybees

An Aerial-Aquatic Vehicle Thanks to Honeybees

Image courtesy of Needpix. Can a honeybee swim? In a recent paper, California Institute of Technology research engineer Chris Roh and professor Morteza Gharib found that honeybees transform their wings into “hydrofoils” after falling into water. Though optimized for flight,

Water, Water Everywhere: A New Model Predicts that Many Planets Harbor Plenty of this Life-Sustaining Fluid

Water, Water Everywhere: A New Model Predicts that Many Planets Harbor Plenty of this Life-Sustaining Fluid

Exoplanets capture our imagination, and recent missions have discovered thousands more around neighbouring stars. However, even when discovered, the compositions of exoplanets are difficult to study because of the sheer distance away from us. A recent paper by Harvard University