Back to homepage

Matter and Energy

Killer Graphene: using pencil lead to kill bacteria

Killer Graphene: using pencil lead to kill bacteria

You have most likely seen them before: surfaces such as coatings on medical devices that claim to have anti-bacterial properties, killing germs that land on them. Current methods for creating anti-bacterial surface involve the use of either transition metals, such

Read Full Article
What is a Black Hole?

What is a Black Hole?

The term “black hole” was coined in the 1960s by physicist Robert Dicke, aptly deriving from the Black Hole of Calcutta, an inescapable prison. But various fields of science assign different properties to these stellar objects—an issue professor Erik Curiel

Read Full Article
Scanning the Galaxy: The discovery of a hot Saturn

Scanning the Galaxy: The discovery of a hot Saturn

Have you ever wondered what may exist outside our solar system? In order to better understand our galaxy, NASA utilizes space telescopes to survey the sky, including the Transmitting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) launched last year. Like the Kepler mission,

Read Full Article
The Poison Squad: One chemist’s crusade for food safety

The Poison Squad: One chemist’s crusade for food safety

Once known as “Dr. Wiley’s Law,” the Pure Food and Drug Act of 1906 was the first of many regulations that advocated for food safety and consumer protection in response to the use of harmful food preservatives—in­cluding formaldehyde, borax, copper,

Read Full Article
The Future of Fusion Energy

The Future of Fusion Energy

The Future of Fusion Energy by Jason Parisi (YC ’16), a PhD student at Oxford, and Justin Ball, a researcher at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, attempts to shift the culture of popular science surrounding fusion energy. For decades,

Read Full Article
Cady Van Assendelft (SM ’19)

Cady Van Assendelft (SM ’19)

“I’ve basically known that I want to do physics for probably a decade now,” said Cady van Assendelft, a senior intensive physics major at Yale. In her junior year of high school, she had an influential physics teacher who made

Read Full Article
Follow the Energy, See Where it Goes: Investigating the energetic expenditures of embryonic cleavage divisions

Follow the Energy, See Where it Goes: Investigating the energetic expenditures of embryonic cleavage divisions

Energy is a tricky concept. The term is bandied around within and without science; even among scientists, “ener­gy” takes different meanings in different contexts. Though it is far from straight­forward to define what energy actually is, more important is what

Read Full Article
Harvesting a Wide Range of Light: Computational chemistry & organic synthesis create a new light-absorbing molecule

Harvesting a Wide Range of Light: Computational chemistry & organic synthesis create a new light-absorbing molecule

Nothing is perfect, but often, nature comes pretty close. Photosynthesis, the process that converts light into electrochemical energy, is something researchers want to emulate. It happens to be the single biochemical process that sustains life on Earth, not least because

Read Full Article
Holding onto Energy: New insights into lithium sulfur batteries

Holding onto Energy: New insights into lithium sulfur batteries

Batteries have revolutionized modern life. Now, there is a push for bat­teries to undergo their own revolution. The electronics we use on a dai­ly basis run on lithium-ion batteries, but a new battery with lower cost and higher energy density

Read Full Article
Some Dark Matters: Newly discovered galaxies lack dark matter

Some Dark Matters: Newly discovered galaxies lack dark matter

For astronomy researchers, the invisible nature of dark mat­ter is one of the most perplexing features of our universe. Dark matter is a theoretical form of matter that does not interact with light, and therefore cannot be directly observed by

Read Full Article