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Matter and Energy

Not so Hot! Reevaluating the temperature of ancient oceans

Not so Hot! Reevaluating the temperature of ancient oceans

Do you ever get discouraged by how long it takes to change the temperature of the water in your bath tub? Well, it could be worse. Imagine how long it would take to change the temperature of an entire ocean

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Lessons from Simulating Intergalactic “Pancakes”: Studying the Nature of Matter Between Galaxies

Lessons from Simulating Intergalactic “Pancakes”: Studying the Nature of Matter Between Galaxies

“We are stardust,” sang Joni Mitchell at Woodstock. Yes, with the exception of dark matter, the atoms that make up the vastness of space and all the galaxies within it are essentially the same as the atoms that make up

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The First Ever Molecule: HeH’s Domination of the Early Universe

The First Ever Molecule: HeH’s Domination of the Early Universe

Hydrogen and helium are the two most abundant and simplest elements in our universe. They are crucial for star formation and other processes like stellar nucleosynthesis—the creation of new, increasingly complex elements in stars. Through this process, hydrogen and helium

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Q&A: Can Antineutrinos Monitor Nuclear Reactors?

Q&A: Can Antineutrinos Monitor Nuclear Reactors?

Nuclear power holds potential to be a powerful and emission-free energy source. With a growing demand for energy and fear of pollution from fossil fuels, nuclear energy is being reconsidered, and with it comes the potential for accidents and malicious

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Two Birds, One Photon: Materials that could revolutionize solar power

Two Birds, One Photon: Materials that could revolutionize solar power

Solar panels have become a common fixture of clean, renewable technology, providing energy from the sunlight rather than fossil fuels. These panels are covered in solar cells, which are made of semiconductormaterials that electrons can move through with relative ease.

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A High-Pressure Chemistry Test: Theoretically Evaluating Atoms Under Compression

A High-Pressure Chemistry Test: Theoretically Evaluating Atoms Under Compression

When we study the properties of elements in a typical chemistry classroom, we assume the elements are subject to normal atmospheric pressure on Earth. But have you ever wondered what would happen to an atom if you compressed it at

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Killer Graphene: using pencil lead to kill bacteria

Killer Graphene: using pencil lead to kill bacteria

You have most likely seen them before: surfaces such as coatings on medical devices that claim to have anti-bacterial properties, killing germs that land on them. Current methods for creating anti-bacterial surface involve the use of either transition metals, such

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What is a Black Hole?

What is a Black Hole?

The term “black hole” was coined in the 1960s by physicist Robert Dicke, aptly deriving from the Black Hole of Calcutta, an inescapable prison. But various fields of science assign different properties to these stellar objects—an issue professor Erik Curiel

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Scanning the Galaxy: The discovery of a hot Saturn

Scanning the Galaxy: The discovery of a hot Saturn

Have you ever wondered what may exist outside our solar system? In order to better understand our galaxy, NASA utilizes space telescopes to survey the sky, including the Transmitting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) launched last year. Like the Kepler mission,

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The Poison Squad: One chemist’s crusade for food safety

The Poison Squad: One chemist’s crusade for food safety

Once known as “Dr. Wiley’s Law,” the Pure Food and Drug Act of 1906 was the first of many regulations that advocated for food safety and consumer protection in response to the use of harmful food preservatives—in­cluding formaldehyde, borax, copper,

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