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Science vs. The Apocalypse: Antibiotic Resistance

Science vs. The Apocalypse: Antibiotic Resistance

Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons. Since the discovery of penicillin, the first commercialized antibiotic, in 1928, our society has dramatically improved. We have raised life expectancy, improved quality of life, and altogether created a healthier world. However, it’s not just

Q&A: Why does stress turn your hair gray? – Grey hair as a marker of age, wisdom, and stress

Q&A: Why does stress turn your hair gray? – Grey hair as a marker of age, wisdom, and stress

Art by AnMei Little. Have you ever noticed that politicians and CEOs develop grey hairs fairly quickly? Usually the growth of grey or white hairs accompanies old age due to the natural depletion of melanocyte stem cells (MeSCs), which are

Counterpoint: The New 98.6 Degrees – How and why human body temperature has lowered

Counterpoint: The New 98.6 Degrees – How and why human body temperature has lowered

During a sick call or an annual check-up, one of the first measurements collected by the doctor is the patient’s body temperature. Courtesy of Roy Perry on Wikimedia Commons. When you go to the doctor, the first measurement taken—whether it’s

Undergraduate Profile: Alon Millet (BR ’20) – Planting seeds of passion with one of Yale’s most promising future scientists

Undergraduate Profile: Alon Millet (BR ’20) – Planting seeds of passion with one of Yale’s most promising future scientists

Alon Millet’s time at Yale has been defined by his love of sharing and seeking new knowledge. Image courtesy of Millet. No one can capture themselves in three words—let alone someone who juggles writing a master’s thesis, giving campus and

Alumni Profile: Tze-Chiang Chen (PhD ’85) – Following the life of one of the biggest names in electrical engineering

Alumni Profile: Tze-Chiang Chen (PhD ’85) – Following the life of one of the biggest names in electrical engineering

Dr. Tze-Chiang Chen, Vice President at IBM and former Yale graduate. Image courtesy of Chen. From his humble upbringings in Taiwan to his current position as Vice President of Science and Technology in the Research Division at IBM, Tze-Chiang Chen

Q&A: Does being kind make you feel less pain? A new take on an age-old question

Q&A: Does being kind make you feel less pain? A new take on an age-old question

Art by Noora Said. From morphine to ibuprofen, modern medicine has made enormous progress in the field of pain management. However, a recent study conducted by Professor Xiaofei Xie’s lab at Peking University showed that medicine might not be the

An Algorithmic Jury: Using Artificial Intelligence to Predict Recidivism Rates

An Algorithmic Jury: Using Artificial Intelligence to Predict Recidivism Rates

Art by Ellie Gabriel. Over the last two decades, predictive risk assessment tools have been used to determine the fates of millions of individuals in the criminal justice system, deciding whether a defendant will be detained pretrial or released on

Keeping Dry Underwater: Learning Superhydrophobicity from Plants

Keeping Dry Underwater: Learning Superhydrophobicity from Plants

Art by AnMei Little. Hydrophobic materials have many applications, yet many are easily disrupted by the environment, losing their dryness. To find the key to the next generation of highly water-repellent materials, scientists have turned to Mother Nature for inspiration,

Letting Experience Guide the Way: The promise of patient and public involvement in biomedical research

Letting Experience Guide the Way: The promise of patient and public involvement in biomedical research

Map of Angiosarcoma Project Participants. The geographic spread demonstrates the advantages of this project in studying rare diseases. Photo courtesy of Painter et al., 2020. The ultimate goal of clinical and translational research is to leverage scientific discovery and innovation

Dogs on Duty: Canine Detection of Plant Pathogens

Dogs on Duty: Canine Detection of Plant Pathogens

Image courtesy of UIHere. As technological advancement allows the world to become increasingly connected through trade and travel, exotic pathogens spread more easily across the globe. These pathogens are not limited to human disease but include plant pathogens as well.