Q&A: Why is Sleep Important?

Q&A: Why is Sleep Important?

Sleep is key to our survival and well-being, but the exact reasons for its existence are unclear. Much research focuses on the synaptic homeostasis hypothesis, a proposed mechanism that balances synaptic growth and shrinkage to prevent brain damage and support learning.

Q&A: Why did turtles come out of their shells?

Q&A: Why did turtles come out of their shells?

A study in Switzerland challenges our most basic understanding of the turtle, suggesting that it evolved head retraction as a means of predation rather than protection.

Q&A: Why Do Killer Whales Go Through Menopause?

Q&A: Why Do Killer Whales Go Through Menopause?

Why do some species, including humans and killer whales, stop reproducing long before the end of their lives? A new study from Exeter University suggests that older females may gain adaptive advantages by helping to raise their daughters’ calves instead of raising their own.

Q&A: What’s killing our honeybees?

Q&A: What’s killing our honeybees?

Researchers from Penn State have found that a class of chemicals formerly thought to be inert may actually be accelerating honeybee mortality.

Q&A: CO2 Past the Point of No Return?

Q&A: CO2 Past the Point of No Return?

Climate change has begun, and there’s evidence to prove it. Around the world scientists have recorded atmospheric CO2 above 400 parts per million, a level defined as the ceiling for safe CO2 concentrations.

Q&A: Three’s a Crowd—How can a baby have three parents?

Q&A: Three’s a Crowd—How can a baby have three parents?

For parents whose children are at risk of inheriting a mitochondrial disorder, genetic material from a third person can help them conceive a healthy child. Mitochondria are maternally inherited organelles, so if a mother’s mitochondrial DNA is mutated, her children

Q&A: Is your data safe from the government?

Q&A: Is your data safe from the government?

Since the December San Bernardino shooting, this question has dominated national discourse. In order to gain important information, the FBI has pressured Apple to unlock the iPhone of one of the San Bernardino shooters. Apple unequivocally refused, claiming that backdoor

Q&A: Are our phones and books hurting our eyesight?

Q&A: Are our phones and books hurting our eyesight?

Fifty percent of the world’s population may suffer from nearsightedness, or myopia, by the year 2050 according to a recent study authored in part by researcher Kovin Naidoo. Naidoo believes a change in our daily environments is driving this change.

TV Review: Raising the Dinosaur Giant

TV Review: Raising the Dinosaur Giant

Just a few seconds into Raising the Dinosaur Giant, David Attenborough’s voice fills the room and begins to set the scene for a spellbinding documentary. Attenborough, known for narrating The Blue Planet, speaks with a passion that is infectious and

Q&A: Seasons Turned Upside Down, What is the El Niño Effect?

Q&A: Seasons Turned Upside Down, What is the El Niño Effect?

If you are celebrating the warmer temperatures and uncharacteristic winters, thank El Niño. If you’re complaining about the cancellation of your skiing and snow tubing trips, blame El Niño. The force behind the odd weather, El Niño is an aberration