Unraveling the Mystery of Spirochete Growth

Unraveling the Mystery of Spirochete Growth

A recent study by Yale researchers found that Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease, exhibits a unique pattern of cell growth, elongating through discrete “hot zones” of cell wall synthesis that mark where daughter cells will divide. This discovery could help yield new, targeted therapies for Lyme disease.

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Bridging the Depths of the Earth with its Surface

Bridging the Depths of the Earth with its Surface

“Bridgmanite” is hardly a household name. And yet, bridgmanite is likely the most abundant mineral on Earth, composing much of the mantle, the thickest layer of our planet. This mineral may provide clues into how the solid Earth—and its atmosphere—has evolved over its long history.

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Lucy [Falling Through] the Sky with Diamonds: Compressive fractures suggest cause of early hominin’s death

Lucy [Falling Through] the Sky with Diamonds: Compressive fractures suggest cause of early hominin’s death

One of the oldest cold cases in history is the death of Lucy, the 3.2-million-year-old hominin. John Kappelman, who completed his undergraduate training at Yale, did some detective work on Lucy’s skeleton; an analysis of her bone fractures revealed that she may have died from falling out of a tree.

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Yale-based Targeted Immunotherapies Receive Funding

Yale-based Targeted Immunotherapies Receive Funding

Yale professor of chemistry David Spiegel and his company Kleo Pharmaceuticals are working to develop drug platforms that could be revolutionary immunotherapies for treating cancer and infectious diseases. “Kleo” is a synthesis of the names of Spiegel’s wife and son.

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Lessons from Failure: Mission to launch an advanced X-ray spectrometer continues

Lessons from Failure: Mission to launch an advanced X-ray spectrometer continues

Five weeks after launch, the highly anticipated X-ray satellite Hitomi disintegrated. As researchers look towards future missions, they will use key insights from Hitomi to construct more robust satellites.

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A Real-life “Jurassic World”:  Recreating Historic Evolutionary Transitions in the Laboratory

A Real-life “Jurassic World”: Recreating Historic Evolutionary Transitions in the Laboratory

Rather than speculate on how organisms evolved certain adaptations, scientists are attempting to recreate some of these historic transitions—such as the development of fins into feet—in the lab.

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Charge Quantization: No Discrete Matter

Charge Quantization: No Discrete Matter

In collaboration with the physicists from the University of Paris, Yale Professor Leonid Glazman has developed a theoretical framework for better understanding the properties of electric charge in nanoscale devices.

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Sowing the CEIDs for the Next Great Innovations: From Research to Startups at Yale’s Design Factory

Sowing the CEIDs for the Next Great Innovations: From Research to Startups at Yale’s Design Factory

The CEID was bustling with activity this summer, as teams of engineering students developed innovative devices to combat real-world problems. One such invention was Acantha, a one-handed catheter delivery system developed by Yale engineering students Brandon Hudik and Andres Ornelas Vargas. This duo is continuing their work beyond their eight-week fellowship at the CEID and plan to scale up the development of their product.

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Schrodinger’s (Twin) Cat: Quantum Computing Researchers Pioneer Two-Cavity Cat-States

Schrodinger’s (Twin) Cat: Quantum Computing Researchers Pioneer Two-Cavity Cat-States

Alive or dead? Cutting-edge research by scientists at Yale multiplies the power of Schrodinger’s cat, heralding the age of the quantum computer.

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Yale Fights Back Against Aggressive Cancers

Yale Fights Back Against Aggressive Cancers

The Yale Cancer Biology Institute on West Campus is now the nexus of a new initiative geared towards understanding the dynamic changes in cell behavior that characterize cancer. The Institute, together with its collaborators, was the recipient of a 9.5 million dollar grant from the NIH; the funding may pave the way for more advanced therapies that target metastatic cells.

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