Reinventing the Robot: Soft Robotics Could Be the Next Step

Reinventing the Robot: Soft Robotics Could Be the Next Step

A fun soft robot is changing the way we understand robotic limitations.

Out of this World: Undergraduate Profile: Sophia Sánchez-Maes (TD ’19)

Out of this World: Undergraduate Profile: Sophia Sánchez-Maes (TD ’19)

For someone who spends most of her time thinking about outer space, Sophia Sánchez-Maes is firmly grounded in her research here on Earth. From examining algae to studying exoplanets, the burgeoning astrophysicist retains a refreshing curiosity about the world, something

A Clothing Cool Down

A Clothing Cool Down

Stanford researchers have engineered a new polyethylene-based textile that is able to keep the body cooler than any currently available fabric.

Rain on Black Holes

Rain on Black Holes

Nearly every observed galaxy has a giant black hole at its center. Clues lead us to believe that these monsters, weighing as much a billion suns, consume copious amounts of gas from their environment and occasionally spew-out some of it

Antibodies Against Alzheimer’s

Antibodies Against Alzheimer’s

Researchers from Biogen may have discovered how to harness the human immune system’s own disease-fighting capabilities to create a therapy for Alzheimer’s disease.

Book Review: Patient H.M.

Book Review: Patient H.M.

Luke Dittrich’s new book, Patient H.M.: A Story of Memory, Madness, and Family Secrets, introduces a welcome complexity into simplistic understandings of medical ethics.

Book Review: The Genius of Birds

Book Review: The Genius of Birds

Birds are “bird-brained” no more–in her new book, Jennifer Ackerman explores research on the cognitive science of birds that has exploded in the past two decades to yield new understandings of bird intelligence and our own.

Q&A: What causes Pruney Fingers?

Q&A: What causes Pruney Fingers?

You may remember staring at your hands after a bath as a little kid, intrigued by how your small, smooth hands had transformed into a wrinkled pair. “Look Mom, I have Grandma’s hands,” you might have said. For centuries, “pruney

Q&A: Does Cupping Work?

Q&A: Does Cupping Work?

After the Rio Olympics, interest in cupping, a traditional Chinese therapy, spiked. Many sufferers of chronic pain, often those with immune, metabolic, or cardiovascular disease, are trying cupping therapy, and some are even reporting positive results. Although different methods of

The Red King Effect: Winning the Co-evolutionary Race

The Red King Effect: Winning the Co-evolutionary Race

A study conducted at the University of Chicago on ant-plant relationships has challenged the theory that organisms in a mutualistic relationship evolve at a slower rate than non-mutualists.