Science in the Spotlight: Doing Harm

Science in the Spotlight: Doing Harm

Maya Dusenbery’s new book, Doing Harm, provides a poignant and critical examination of the implicit biases and sexism that cause the mistreatment of women in the contemporary medical system. Weaving together vivid anecdotes, rich history, and hard statistics on the

Repurposed: Weaponizing Wheat

Repurposed: Weaponizing Wheat

Recently, it may seem that politics has become louder, brasher, and more annoying than ever. This political climate may mean that it’s easier for less exciting, but still dangerous, programs to slip through the cracks of the American news cycle,

The Unexpected Upsides of Antibiotics

The Unexpected Upsides of Antibiotics

A group of Yale researchers made an unexpected discovery when experimenting with aminoglycoside antibiotics. Studying their effects on mice models, the team found that in addition to fighting bacterial infections, they may increase antiviral resistance. Initially, the researchers were hoping

Robotic Role Models Show Therapeutic Promise

Robotic Role Models Show Therapeutic Promise

We often take for granted our ability to detect social cues such as facial expressions and body language. For many children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD),  this social-communicative ability is not innate and instead must be learned. Unfortunately, most

Help or Harm? Rethinking Common Surgeries

Help or Harm? Rethinking Common Surgeries

What if a straightforward medical procedure you had as a child could drastically increase your risk of health complications far into the future? Tonsillectomies, adenoidectomies, and adenotonsillectomies, which are surgeries commonly performed on young patients, are often meant to treat

New, Inexpensive Nanoscale Polymers Have Many Potential Applications

New, Inexpensive Nanoscale Polymers Have Many Potential Applications

Imagine if we could turn all the world’s saltwater into drinking water using a simple filter with tiny pores to catch salt particles. Such purification technology, which could save millions of lives, may be possible using materials called nanophase-separated block

Membranes Versus Microbes: How Yale and Shandong University researchers are zapping antibiotic-resistant bacteria in our water supply

Membranes Versus Microbes: How Yale and Shandong University researchers are zapping antibiotic-resistant bacteria in our water supply

Fishing can be quite the challenge, even for the experienced fisherman. The challenge of removing every live fish from the ocean thus seems rather silly. It becomes even more difficult when the problem is scaled down to the world of

Cell-Penetrating Peptides: HPV’s Way Out

Cell-Penetrating Peptides: HPV’s Way Out

Human Papillomavirus (HPV) is a sexually transmitted virus that can cause a variety of unpleasant symptoms, including genital warts and cervical cancer. While the Center for Disease Control (CDC) estimates that around 79 million Americans are infected, most people with

Hippopotami as Engineers

Hippopotami as Engineers

Hippos may not be able to do math or solve complicated physics equations, but it turns out that they play a major role as engineers in the environment.  A joint team of researchers from Yale University and the Cary Institute

Pass the Lipids: Uncovering the link between lipid transport and neurodegenerative disease

Pass the Lipids: Uncovering the link between lipid transport and neurodegenerative disease

The fundamental building block of life is the cell, but that doesn’t mean that cells themselves are static members of a bigger being. Rather, cells are like tiny little factories that perform specific tasks and manufacture different products: fat cells