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Search Results for Jenny Mei

The Mechanisms and Perception of Itch

The Mechanisms and Perception of Itch

Dr. Robert LaMotte’s Laboratory at the Yale School of Medicine studies the perception and mechanisms of itch in an effort to derive better treatments for chronic itch.

Research Links Sugar Consumption, Fat Production, and Diabetes

Research Links Sugar Consumption, Fat Production, and Diabetes

Dr. Varman Samuel’s Laboratory at Yale School of Medicine has uncovered a feed-forward mechanism whereby excess sugar consumption may lead to increased fat production in the liver and the ensuing development of diabetes.

Spontaneous Self-Healing in Icthyosis

Spontaneous Self-Healing in Icthyosis

Mutations that occur in genes during DNA replication and cell division lead to a wide range of diseases, from cancer to sickle-cell anemia. In the case of ichthyosis with confetti, however, recombination can revert the mutated phenotype and change affected

Influenza Renders Immune System Vulnerable

Influenza Renders Immune System Vulnerable

Recent research shows that having the flu can make you vulnerable to secondary bacterial infections via immunosuppression.

Guanfacine: The Future for ADHD Treatment

Guanfacine: The Future for ADHD Treatment

Imagine having a child who is so uncontrollably disruptive that going out to eat at restaurants is never an option. With no friends at school, he is just as frustrated as anyone else about his inability to focus. “ADHD [attention

Reading + Science = Literacy : Haskins Laboratories and the Promise of Eliminating Illiteracy

Reading + Science = Literacy : Haskins Laboratories and the Promise of Eliminating Illiteracy

It is estimated that nowadays only a third of American eighth-graders can read proficiently and up to twenty percent of youths have some sort of reading disability. Moreover, students lacking in basic reading comprehension skills often struggle in other academic

Nanoparticles: Tiny miracles for those on the quest for the perfect drug

Nanoparticles: Tiny miracles for those on the quest for the perfect drug

What if you could make the perfect drug? Would you prefer to avoid side effects, prescribe lower doses, or decide when and where your drug attacks? While ultimate perfection in drug engineering may not be in the immediate future, these

That Which We Call a Rose

That Which We Call a Rose

What’s in a name? The answer is a lot, although it is mostly in the initials. Research at Yale conducted by Joseph Simmons, assistant professor of marketing, indicates that people unconsciously make decisions based on their names. In a paper

Mechanism of Bacterial Infection in Legionnaire’s disease

Mechanism of Bacterial Infection in Legionnaire’s disease

It is not often that a pathogen is compared to a “crafty burglar,” yet the description is apt for the bacteria that causes Legionnaire’s disease, a severe form of pneumonia. When Legionella pneumophila enters the body, it is ingested by macrophages and

Smell then tell: New neurons in the adult brain receive signals before forming synapses of their own

Smell then tell: New neurons in the adult brain receive signals before forming synapses of their own

“Smell is cool,” quipped Charles Greer, professor of neurosurgery and neurobiology at the School of Medicine, when asked how he would summarize his research on the neurological workings of the olfactory system for a five-year old. When the question was